assent

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assent to

To agree to something. The union has finally assented to the new contract.
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I guess

I suppose; sure. Often used as an affirmative answer when one is not completely certain or does not want to fully commit. Bob: "You look a little down today. Everything alright?" Mary: "I guess. I've just been feeling vaguely melancholy lately." A: "It's supposed to be sunny today, right?" B: "I guess. I haven't checked the weather."
See also: guess

assent to something

to agree to something. I assent to what you suggest. She will not assent to our request.
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I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

assent to

v.
To agree to something: The committee assented to the proposal that they had been discussing.
See also: assent
References in classic literature ?
He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended legislation:
"In sport, at any rate," his neighbour assented. "He has always been one of the most popular young men about town, but of course the women will spoil him now."
Yes, I know him," she assented, after a moment's hesitation.
"I thought of that," the Prime Minister assented. "That is why I am coming down myself and bringing Bransome.
You have spoken of my `secret meddling,' and my `interfering ignorance,' and my `false assent.' I have never expressed myself in that way to you, and I think that you ought to apologize.
It's just by the eyes, by smiles that it's done," Dolly assented.
Hugh yielding a ready assent, they bent their steps that way with no loss of time.
Noirtier tenderly loves his granddaughter, Mademoiselle de Villefort; it is she who has nursed and tended him for six years, and has, by her devoted attention, fully secured the affection, I had almost said the gratitude, of her grandfather, and it is but just that she should reap the fruit of her devotion." The eye of Noirtier clearly showed by its expression that he was not deceived by the false assent given by Madame de Villefort's words and manner to the motives which she supposed him to entertain.
'Whenever Mr President assents to law and there is something wrong with that law, it is the public that will question both the legislature and the Executive through the court.
figure If Uhuru assents to the Finance Bill, the VAT will be suspended, bringing down the cost of fuel.
"As we prepare this vellum, this law can only be reversed when the president assents to the Finance Bill, 2018," Duale said.
Anwar claimed that Article 66(4A) of the Federal Constitution, which allows a parliamentary bill to automatically become law 30 days after it is presented to the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, regardless whether he assents to it or not, was unconstitutional.
And this specifies faith, the way any cognoscitive habit has its species from the reason [ratione] by which it assents to anything.
He added, "The way is that any bill approved by the assembly shall not become a law unless the president assents to it and signs it into law.
(3) The differences between the assents given by the Parliament of Canada in 1937, 1947 and 1953 are evident in the wordings of the relevant sections of each act.