assail with

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assail with

1. Literally, to attack someone with a weapon. A person's name or a pronoun can be used between "assail" and "with." The robber assailed her with a knife. I was assailed with a brick by the carjacker.
2. By extension, to overwhelm or irritate someone with something. A person's name or a pronoun can be used between "assail" and "with." Because finals are approaching, my students are constantly assailing me with questions. I'm always assailed with tasks from my boss.

assail someone with something

 
1. Lit. to attack someone with something, such as a weapon. The crook assailed the officer with the officer's own club. The riot police were assailed with stones and bottles.
2. Fig. to pester or annoy someone with questions, requests, demands, etc. Don't assail me with all your complaints. She assailed herself with constant guilty rebukes.
References in periodicals archive ?
White House spokesman Ari Fleischer assails as "particularly disturbing" the attack on Kerem Shalom, calling it a blatant assault on Arafat's authority.
And she makes a crucial point when she assails the crude Bushism that you're either with the U.
Baraka assails the white concept of gender equality in favor of submissive women; and his suspicions of imperialism under any guise, although he adopts Marxism, ultimately lead him through political twists, fraught with ambiguities, between the expressive and performative modes, coming to rest in what Olaniyan describes as change.
McGruder's take-no-prisoners strip assails anyone who might possibly diminish American black culture, from disinterested politicians to celebrities catering to the lowest common denominator who cynically kowtow to base African-American stereotypes.
Fridson assails certain popular misconceptions and explains why they're wrong.
Perhaps equally "chilling" are scenes in which a chimpanzee assails a smaller primate in a breathless pursuit high in the trees, and a group of chimps form an organized mob to ruthlessly persecute one of their own kind who has run afoul of the social structure.
He assails Communist China for the dastardly perfidy to sell Americans so many billions of textiles now that import quotas are gone.
As Rumrich challenges the fiction of a Protestant common reader, he assails those critics who use the dubious notion of a mainstream Protestantism to recast Milton as "the voice of the emergent bourgeoisie" (35).
He assails the Catholic Church for opposing his condom solution to HIV/AIDS in Africa.
Lalonde contends that "safeguards" are built into her bill to prevent abuse, but Schadenberg assails what he sees as ambiguities and unclear definitions throughout.