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Q: In a June 2003 column, you wrote that we should have an open mind while asking tough questions of the Bush Administration regarding its credibility on weapons of mass destruction.
Applicants may say to themselves "They're asking me my gender and race--isn't that wrong?
While students worked on the assigned task, Kathleen walked around observing their work, taking notes, and asking questions as she learned about the mathematical thinking of individual students.
1999) (officer did not display a weapon when asking defendant for consent to search car); United States v.
If people understand why you're asking, they are much less likely to take offense.
BernardHenry Levy wrote an article for La Repubblica, Italy's second largest newspaper, asking what more the Jews want.
Originally, we planned to inform the administrator of her visit after the fact, asking him then whether or not he wished to identify the facility in print.
During group presentations, Julie was more active, asking questions to test the students' understanding.
Instead of asking a pointed question about a specific program, perhaps a question informed by a little reporting, the journalist simply inquires vaguely about the domestic agenda, thereby throwing open the window to an amorphous, buzzing swarm of fly-by-night Bush proposals for the homefront: "I want, as you know, a crime bill.
Written in winning language, filled with sample dialogues, and offering a wealth of tips and tools, this book addresses common mistakes made when asking and shows how to correct each mistake, providing guidance and direction on how to make a great ask.
In selected major retail corridors, the ground floor median asking rent was up 26 percent on Madison Avenue to $1000 per square foot.
He stared at me and I could see he was asking himself, 'Is he or isn't he?
Your class can easily distract her by asking her about her dog Muffles or her bridge club.
But if, as individuals and a profession, we seek a higher standard, then it is time we started asking some hard questions about what we're teaching others.
They are not necessarily asking for honor; they may be asking for companionship not just with each other but with Christ Jesus.