ascribe to

ascribe (something) to (something)

To attribute something to a person or source. Unless you want the teacher to think you're plagiarizing, be sure to ascribe all of your quotes to the proper sources. Can you believe this ludicrous statement that's been ascribed to the CEO?
See also: ascribe

ascribe something to someone or something

to attribute something to someone or something; to assert that something has been caused by someone or something. Please do not ascribe that attitude to my friends. We ascribed the offensive action to Jill and only Jill.
See also: ascribe
References in periodicals archive ?
All of the characteristics the researchers ascribe to sexual abusers ("Men of Prey," SN: 7/27/02, p.
Bush refused to criticize Ward, saying, "I don't necessarily ascribe to the same biblical interpretation as others, but I do believe we need to have tolerance on both sides.
3:6, Paul claims that he was "blameless as to the law." To ascribe to Paul the belief that God gave Israel a law the people were incapable of living up to is to ascribe a very perverse view of God to the apostle.
This leads the author to privilege organizations and tendencies which approximate these ideals (such as those informing the origins and ideology of the Frente Negra Brasileira); it also leads her to ascribe to this fictional community a history, a political philosophy, and common experience.
Liberals never acknowledge their own hatred of Western traditions; they merely ascribe their hostility to their "idealism," a motive their self-congratulation won't allow them to ascribe to conservatives.
Now the debate, like the country, has become partitioned into those who would ascribe to "art" an essentialism that they would deny to "Irishness" and those who refuse to ascribe essentialism to either.
He as much as admits this when he draws a parallel between our thoughts and those of our peers; we ascribe to our peers thoughts of the sort we ascribe to ourselves.