artificial language


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artificial language

A language devised for a specific purpose, such as computer programming. We need to develop an artificial language for this coding project.
See also: language
References in periodicals archive ?
By the seventeenth century, these categories were swiftly deteriorating and they were certainly highly fluid, so his lengthy exegesis on the religious and natural philosophical but not occult philosophical leanings of the artificial language movement seems forced.
To test this hypothesis, an experiment using artificial languages with different stress patterns was run.
second, each artificial language is fated to be no language at all but at best a translation of real languages into a pseudo-language, invented as a game that could satisfy neither poets nor scholars.
A new study suggests that adults can exploit patterns in an artificial language to discern novel nonsense words in a stream of syllables, but use a different mental computation to discover rules governing the construction of those words.
Now he has been asked to organise a high-profile opening of the EsperantoAsocio de Britio's (the British Esperanto Association) new headquarters and will be part of a new development group to market the artificial language nationally.
When the author drops the artificial language of the sociologist, both she and the reader become engaged in the community she is describing.
In the second half of the century, Bacon's suggestion materialized in the project sponsored by the Royal Society to devise an artificial language. John Wilkins, for example, in his 800-page An Essay Toward a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language (1668) describes a set of characters intended to represent directly the objects or notions common to all men.(4) Each character stands for a thing or an idea, and when properly distributed and combined they are to correspond with empirical observation or philosophical ordering.
4 Kyodo The head of the world headquarters for Esperanto speakers is confident that the artificial language created in the late 19th century for better international communication will not die out in the coming decades.
Andras takes seriously the German definition of the poet-he is a born Dichter, a condenser of words and phrases-but at the same time he cannot trust the traditional expression of feelings; so he submits words to a semantic analysis, pares off their roots, plays with their possible ambivalences, and creates a curiously artificial language of his own.
The first is that of Leibniz in his preliminary writings for the project of an artificial language that never saw the light of day, the Characteristica universalis; the second is that of Kleist in his famous short text Uber die allmahliche Verfertigung des Gedanken beim Reden, 1805 (On the Progressive Elaboration of Thought in Language).
A Polish philologist, Ludwik Lejzer Zamenhof (1859-1917), designed an artificial language, which he called Esperanto (hope), because he dreamed that a common language for the world might foster international understanding and peace.
By doing this we would have started to create an artificial language to describe the contents of the animal's mental states.
In Vyrozumeni (1965; translated as The Memorandum, 1967), the crisis of human communication reaches an extreme point when the bureaucracy introduces an artificial language, Ptydepe, which is too difficult to be mastered.
In a series of artificial language learning experiments participants will be familiarized with artificial languages that contain either matching or mismatching auditory and visual cueswhich will displayed by means of a computer-animated avatarand will be subsequently tested on their segmentation preferences.