art


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down to a fine art

Learned, mastered, or understood perfectly, to the point of requiring little or no focus to do, recall, or accomplish. Make sure you practice these equations until you have them down to a fine art. I always get my routine down to a fine art so there won't be any room for error during the performance.
See also: art, down, fine

art is long and life is short

A phrase that emphasizes the permanence of art and the fleeting nature of human life. As I've gotten older, I've been painting more because I know that art is long and life is short.
See also: and, art, life, long, short

have (something) down to a fine art

To do something well or efficiently, typically due to one's experience at it. I'm a working mom of three, so I've got lunch-making down to a fine art—I put out all the pieces of bread, add jelly to each one, and then do the same with peanut butter.
See also: art, down, fine, have

to a fine art

In a manner or form that is masterful. The English have raised the simple act of making a cup of tea to a fine art. Make sure you practice these equations until you have them down to a fine art.
See also: art, fine

have (something) off to a fine art

To do something well or efficiently, typically due to one's experience at it. I'm a working mom of three, so I have lunch-making off to a fine art—I put out all the pieces of bread, add jelly to each one, and then do the same with peanut butter.
See also: art, fine, have, off

state of the art

Having or using the most advanced, up-to-date technology available. (Hyphenated if used before a noun.) Our new state-of-the-art facility will be at the forefront of cancer research. After working in such a drab, old-fashioned office for so long, it's refreshing to work somewhere that's so state of the art.
See also: art, of, state

art for art's sake

The idea that art has no larger purpose or message than being an artistic expression. Don't interpret this piece as some sort of political statement—it's just art for art's sake.
See also: art, sake

be art and part of (something)

To actively participate in something. I really hope you aren't art and part of your brother's foolish schemes.
See also: and, art, of, part

the noble art (of self-defense)

The sport of boxing. Any two yahoos can get into a fistfight, but it takes real skill, dedication, and training to learn the noble art of self-defense. He spent most of his career training in the noble art before joining the world of mixed martial arts last year.
See also: art, noble

fine art

Something that requires finely-honed abilities and/or a particular expertise. Managing an entire team of people is a fine art—I don't think I could do it as well as Joann does.
See also: art, fine

Art is long and life is short.

Prov. Works of art last much longer than human lives.; Life is too short to learn everything you need to know about a particular discipline. Alan: You ought to do something besides paint pictures in your spare time. Come out with us, have some fun. Bob: Having fun will not win me immortality. Only my paintings can do that. Art is long and life is short. I always feel a sense of awe when I look at the Babylonian statues in the art museum. They were made thousands of years ago. Art is long and life is short.
See also: and, art, life, long, short

state of the art

using the most recent technology. (Hyphenated before nouns.) Our company's computer setup is strictly state of the art. This state-of-the-art radio is capable of filling the whole room with sound.
See also: art, of, state

work of art

 
1. Lit. a piece of art. She purchased a lovely work of art for her living room.
2. . Fig. a good result of one's efforts. Your report was a real work of art. Very well done.
See also: art, of, work

fine art

Something requiring highly developed techniques and skills, as in He's turned lying into a fine art, or The contractor excels in the fine art of demolition. This term alludes to the fine arts, such as music, painting, and sculpture, which require both skill and talent. It is now often used to describe anything that takes skill to do. [First half of 1800s]
See also: art, fine

state of the art

The highest level of development, very up-to-date, as in This new television set reflects the state of the art in screen technology. Despite including the word art, this term originated in technology, and its first recorded use appears in a 1910 book on the gas turbine. Today it is often used adjectivally, as in This is a state-of-the-art camera, and sometimes very loosely, as in That movie is state-of-the-art Woody Allen.
See also: art, of, state

have something down to a fine art

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

have got something down to a fine art

BRITISH
If you have an activity down to a fine art, you know the best way of doing it because you have done it a lot. They've got fruit retailing down to a fine art. You can be sure that your pears will ripen in a day. Shopping for food is the biggest problem, though she has it down to a fine art. `I go to the cheapest shops and buy only frozen or canned goods'.
See also: art, down, fine, have, something

state of the art

or

state-of-the-art

COMMON Something that is state of the art or state-of-the-art has the most modern and advanced features and technology. The new apartments would be state of the art. We've now installed our own state-of-the-art cameras.
See also: art, of, state

art for art's sake

the idea that a work of art has no purpose beyond itself.
This phrase is the slogan of artists who hold that the chief or only aim of a work of art is the self-expression of the individual artist who creates it.
See also: art, sake

be art and part of

be an accessory or participant in; be deeply involved in.
Be art and part of was originally a Scottish legal expression: art referred to the bringing about of an action and part to participation in it.
See also: and, art, of, part

have (or get) something down to a fine art

achieve a high level of skill, facility, or accomplishment in some activity through experience.
See also: art, down, fine, have, something

the noble art

boxing. chiefly archaic
A fuller version of this phrase is the noble art (or science ) of self-defence .
See also: art, noble

state of the art

the most recent stage in the development of a product, incorporating the newest ideas and the most up-to-date features.
See also: art, of, state

have something down to a fine ˈart

(informal, often humorous) learn through experience how to do something perfectly: I found it difficult to organize the timetables at first, but now I’ve got it down to a fine art.She has complaining in restaurants down to a fine art! Head waiters are terrified of her.
See also: art, down, fine, have, something

ˌstate of the ˈart

using the most modern or advanced techniques or methods; as good as it can be at the present time: The security system we’re using is state of the art.This computer uses state-of-the-art technology.
See also: art, of, state
References in classic literature ?
And we have admitted, I said, that the good of each art is specially confined to the art?
And when the artist is benefited by receiving pay the advantage is gained by an additional use of the art of pay, which is not the art professed by him?
But the truth is, that while the art of medicine gives health, and the art of the builder builds a house, another art attends them which is the art of pay.
But surely, Thrasymachus, the arts are the superiors and rulers of their own subjects?
Let me ask you a question: Are not the several arts different, by reason of their each having a separate function?
Then now, Thrasymachus, there is no longer any doubt that neither arts nor governments provide for their own interests; but, as we were before saying, they rule and provide for the interests of their subjects who are the weaker and not the stronger-- to their good they attend and not to the good of the superior.
If a man approaches a work of art with any desire to exercise authority over it and the artist, he approaches it in such a spirit that he cannot receive any artistic impression from it at all.
No spectator of art needs a more perfect mood of receptivity than the spectator of a play.
Thackeray's 'Esmond' is a beautiful work of art because he wrote it to please himself.
It will be what the Greeks sought for, but could not, except in Thought, realise completely, because they had slaves, and fed them; it will be what the Renaissance sought for, but could not realise completely except in Art, because they had slaves, and starved them.
They have neither the matured and systematically trained powers of the Polygonal Bachelors and Masters of Arts, nor yet the native precocity and mercurial versatility of the youthful Tradesman.
This being so, if perchance anyone of thy kinsfolk should come to see thee when thou art in thine island, thou art not to repel or slight him, but on the contrary to welcome him, entertain him, and make much of him; for in so doing thou wilt be approved of heaven
If perchance thou art left a widower- a thing which may happen- and in virtue of thy office seekest a consort of higher degree, choose not one to serve thee for a hook, or for a fishing-rod, or for the hood of thy 'won't have it;' for verily, I tell thee, for all the judge's wife receives, the husband will be held accountable at the general calling to account; where he will have repay in death fourfold, items that in life he regarded as naught.
The humanist movement hasn't yet replenished the chasms left by godlessness, but through art, humanism could address our religious desires in a secular fashion.
Daily preservation arts classes for majors hone in on the art and science of preservation.