arrow of time


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arrow of time

A phrase used to describe the direction of time as it moves from past to future. It is typically associated with scientific study. I'm researching the arrow of time this semester.
See also: arrow, of, time

arrow of time (or time's arrow)

the direction of travel from past to future in time considered as a physical dimension.
See also: arrow, of, time
References in periodicals archive ?
God's arrow of time is directed by the Incarnation, the Birth of Jesus Christ.
The post The arrow of time moves in only one direction; forwards appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
It's the only clear, simple idea that's been put forward to explain the basis of the arrow of time," says physicist Julian Barbour, a coauthor of the study published last October in Physical Review Letters.
What we are concerned with now is the thermodynamic arrow of time, the growth of entropy.
Thus one constructs a generalized QM (with arrow of time and connections to gravity for which we refer to [3]).
The implacable Arrow of Time is passing through this moment and this place, leaving one world we know very well and flying toward another one that we know little of.
But you don't need to totally (or even partially) keep up with Cox as he's burbling on about the arrow of time, the second law of ther modynamics, entropy and red, white and black dwarfs to derive pleasure from this series.
Later Stenger says, "the arrow of time of common experience is purely a statistical effect" (second law of thermodynamics).
The cornovaso is only a fragment (an example) extrapolated from the path traced by the extruder and is therefore a metaphor of the arrow of time flowing without interruptions, profile of the becoming; the 'ruin' is instead a fragment (memory) of that perfect form that was, to which we can only allude with imagination, the only possibility to evoke (in a negative way) its fullness and enchantment.
CHARLTON - From birth to death, we travel the arrow of time on a decidedly one-way road.
If the head of the arrow of time can stand for either the past or the future, depending on the conceptual scheme, how can past and future be defined, and how can one distinguish normal time from reversed time?
And maybe the arrow of time points in our direction (that is, toward the "future") in half the universes and in the opposite direction (toward the "past") in the other half.
The phenomenon that David Bohm's eidolon concept seeks to explain (NCR, Feb 2), "Spooky electron behavior suggests hidden wholeness," is also discussed in Peter Coveney and Roger Highfield's 1991 book, titled The Arrow of Time.
featuring the past, present, and future) arrow of time over GF([2.
Peering through the humidity that blanket everything in a dreamy, seductive haze, you have the unmistakable sense that the arrow of time has been frozen in mid-flight-forever linking the past of this ancient place to its present and future.