arrive

(redirected from arriver)
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Related to arriver: Faire, AVOIR, ETRE

arrive at

1. Literally, to reach a destination after traveling. What time are we supposed to arrive at Paul's? Because we got stuck in traffic, we arrived at the party late.
2. To reach a particular decision or understanding. I'm thrilled to announced that the committee has finally arrived at a consensus. Have the doctors arrived at a decision yet?
See also: arrive

arrive (up)on the scene

1. To reach a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police arrive on the scene? By the time I arrived upon the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
2. slang To come into existence or to be born. Funk music arrived on the scene in the 1960s. We are overjoyed to announced that our baby daughter arrived on the scene at 11:37 last night.
See also: arrive, scene

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of

To reach a destination at a specific time. ("Of" is followed by that time.) You must arrive home upon the stroke of 11, young lady. We arrived at the store on the stroke of nine, but the doors were already locked.
See also: arrive, of, stroke

ahead of time

Earlier than a given deadline. If we get to the theater ahead of time, we'll have our pick of good seats. My term paper isn't due until next week, but I finished it ahead of time.
See also: ahead, of, time

come on the scene

1. To reach a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police come on the scene? By the time I came on the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
2. To become involved in a particular situation. Caitlin and I used to be best friends, until Liz came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

on a wing and a prayer

Without much preparation (and thus little hope of success). I didn't have time to edit my term paper so I just submitted it on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

in force

1. Legally enforced; in effect. There was a law like that on the books, but I'm not sure it's still in force.
2. In a large group; at full strength, as of an army. The voters are going to come out against you in force if you don't change your position on this. You better believe the fans will be there in force to support the team at the critical road game.
See also: force

in the nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track in the nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. You got here in the nick of time—we're just about to start the show.
See also: nick, of, time

*ahead of one's time

Fig. having ideas or attitudes that are too advanced to be acceptable in the present. (*Typically: be ~; think ~.) Sue's grandmother was ahead of her time in wanting to study medicine.
See also: ahead, of, time

*ahead of time

beforehand; before the announced time. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; leave ~; show up ~.) If you show up ahead of time, you will have to wait. Be there ahead of time if you want to get a good seat.
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at a decision

 and reach a decision
to make a decision; decide. Have you arrived at a decision yet? We will reach a decision tomorrow.
See also: arrive, decision

arrive back

(some place) Go to back (some place).
See also: arrive, back

arrive

(some place) at some time to reach some place at a particular time. We will arrive at the border at noon. They arrived at seven o'clock in the evening.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time.(Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive

(somewhere) at the stroke of some time Go to arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (up)on the scene (of something)

 and arrive at the scene (of something)
to reach the location of an event in progress. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on and at.) The police arrived on the scene of the crime. They arrived upon the scene of a frightening accident. What did they do when they arrived at the scene?
See also: arrive, on, scene

*back

(at someone) repaying someone for a bad deed. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) Tom called me a jerk, but I'll get back at him. I don't know how I'll get back for her insult, but I will.

*back (some place)

returned to some place; at some place again. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; arrive ~.) I can't wait till we get back home. When will we get back? Is it much farther?

come on the scene

 and arrive on the scene 
1. Lit. to arrive at a place. When we came on the scene, the ambulances were already there. The police arrived on the scene and began directing traffic.
2. Fig. to become part of a situation. She thought she was in love with Harry until Bob came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

have arrived

to have reached a position of power, authority, or prominence. Jane saw her picture on the cover of the magazine and felt that she had finally arrived. When I got an office with a window, I knew that I had arrived.
See also: arrive, have

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

*in force

 
1. [of a rule or law] currently valid or in effect. (*Typically: be ~.) Is this rule in force now? The constitution is still in force.
2. Fig. in a very large group. (*Typically: arrive ~; attack ~.) The entire group arrived in force. The mosquitoes will attack in force this evening.
See also: force

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*on a wing and a prayer

Fig. to arrive or fly in with one's plane in very bad condition. (Sometimes used fig. of other vehicles. *Typically: come (in) ~; arrive ~.) Finally we could see the plane through the smoke, coming in on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

ahead of time

Earlier, sooner, as in The meeting was scheduled for three o'clock, but most people arrived ahead of time. [Early 1900s]
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at

Reach an objective, as in We arrived at the party right on time, or It took Harry only a few minutes to arrive at a solution. [Early 1500s]
See also: arrive

in force

1. In full strength, in large numbers, as in Demonstrators were out in force. This usage originally alluded to a large military force. [Early 1300s]
2. Operative, binding, as in This rule is no longer in force. This usage originally alluded to the binding power of a law. [Late 1400s]
See also: force

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time

on the scene, be

Also, arrive or come on the scene . Be or arrive where an action or event occurs, as in They won't have a wild party because their parents will be on the scene, or Once Bob arrives on the scene, you can expect fireworks. Alluding to the theatrical scene, where a drama is being played, this phrase has been used more loosely since the early 1700s.
See also: on

in the nick of time

COMMON If something happens in the nick of time, it happens at the last possible moment, when it is almost too late. She woke up just in the nick of time and raised the alarm. They got to the hospital in the nick of time, just as the baby was about to be born.
See also: nick, of, time

on a wing and a prayer

If you do something on a wing and a prayer, you do it in the hope that you will succeed, even though you do not have what you need to do it. Dozens of airlines have entered the industry on a wing and a prayer, and dozens have gone bankrupt. In the past, teams have been run on a wing and a prayer. Note: This is the title of a song by H. Adamson, written in 1943, which referred to the emergency landing of an aircraft: `Tho' there's one motor gone, we can still carry on, Comin' In On A Wing And A Pray'r.'
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

in force

in great strength or numbers.
1989 Amy Wilentz The Rainy Season They turned out in force, armed with machetes and cocomacaques.
See also: force

in the nick of time

only just in time; just at the critical moment.
Nick is used here in the sense of ‘the precise moment of an occurrence or an event’. This form of the phrase dates from the mid 17th century, but in the (very ) nick is recorded from the late 16th century.
1985 Nini Herman My Kleinian Home Time and again, when all seemed lost, I somehow won through in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

on a wing and a prayer

with only the slightest chance of success.
This expression comes from the title of a 1943 song by the American songwriter Harold Adamson , ‘Comin' in on a Wing and a Prayer’. He himself took it from a contemporary comment made by a wartime pilot speaking to ground control before making an emergency landing.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

in the ˌnick of ˈtime

(informal) at the last possible moment; just in time: He got to the railway station in the nick of time.He remembered in the nick of time that his passport was in his coat pocket.
See also: nick, of, time

arrive/come on the ˈscene

arrive in/at a place, probably to change the existing situation: John and I were really happy together until she came on the scene.By the time the police arrived on the scene, it was too late.
See also: arrive, come, on, scene

on a ˌwing and a ˈprayer

with only a very slight chance of success: He started the business in his own home, on a wing and a prayer, but it looks like he’s really going to make a success of it.This expression was first used in the military to describe how pilots flying very badly damaged planes succeeded in returning to base.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

arrive at

v.
1. To reach or come to some place: Because of the snowstorm, we arrived at the airport three hours late.
2. To come to some conclusion or decision: I think you're right, but how did you arrive at that answer?
See also: arrive

back

n. one’s support or second in a fight. (From back-up.) I need a back I can depend on.

in force

1. In full strength; in large numbers: Demonstrators were out in force.
2. In effect; operative: a rule that is no longer in force.
See also: force

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Comme pour dire, rien de plus pire ne pourrait nous arriver.
Nous avons beaucoup sacrifie pour arriver a ce resultat [beaucoup plus grand que], a declare, a l'APS, Mohamed Ben Rehmoun, entraineur de la selection algerienne de la lutte sur sable.
Il fallait bien arriver a trouver un compromis entre Bradley Wiggins et Chris Froome.
beaucoup plus grand que] En effet, si une recrue devait arriver, elle devrait attendre janvier, le Barca etant interdit d'enregistrer des nouveaux joueurs avant cette periode.
SUNA) - Une delegation Russe, conduite par le ministre des Ressources naturelles et de l'Environnement doit arriver dimanche a Khartoum pour participer aux reunions du comite ministeriel conjoint Soudano - Russe, qui doit debuter lundi a l'hotel Corinthia a Khartoum.
Les rescapes du plus violent seisme sur le sol iranien en un demi-siecle, ayant fait au moins 41 morts principalement au Pakistan voisin, fouillaient hier mercredi les decombres de leurs maisons alors que les premiers secours commencaient a arriver.
Elle n'a pas reussi a poursuivre l'aventure a Studio 2M vu qu'elle a quitte le programme en demi-finale mais cette fois ci ,la jeune chanteuse a su enthousiasmer le public partout dans le monde, les 3 membres du jury dans chaque interpretation pour y arriver jusqu'au bout.
Le navire norvegien Siem Pilot, a bord duquel ont ete transferes les survivants mais aussi les cadavres de leurs compagnons de voyage, doit arriver dans le port de Catane ce matin.
SUNA)- Le sixieme avion du Croissant-Rouge du Koweit, qui contient de secours en faveur des victimes des inondations et des pluies doit arriver mercredi.
Tout joueur et tout supporter sait que tout peut arriver tant que le coup de sifflet final n'a pas retenti.
Meme apres son depart definitif, l'abrogation de l'article 475 du code penal serait la meilleure chose qui peut lui arriver.
Accompagnes de 70 encadreurs et animateurs de la DJSL, ces enfants, ages de 8 a 14 ans, ont pris le bus a la Place du 1er-Mai, dans la commune de Sidi M'hamed, a 8h30, et devront parcourir environ 340 km pour arriver a destination.
Il a demande de l'entreprise a presenter des etudes et des conseils pour arriver des produits derives du petrole, y compris le gaz pour les citoyens, en exhortant les travailleurs a l'importance de travailler en equipe pour ameliorer la societe.
Lors d'une ceremonie a l'Elysee, Francois Hollande a fait allusion aux [beaucoup moins que]Francais, dans ce moment oE il s'interrogent : est-ce que le cap est bon, est-ce que la direction est bien la plus courte pour arriver a l'essentiel, est-ce que, au-dela des tumultes, des turbulences, nous pouvons reussir ?
a Sidi-Fredj, les estivants ont peine non seulement pour arriver sur les lieux mais aussi pour en repartir.