arm

(redirected from armed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

arm (someone against someone or something) (with something)

to equip someone with whatever is needed to fight against someone or something. They armed themselves against the enemy with guns and ammunition. The government armed the soldiers with the new guns.

arm

n. a police officer. (see also long arm of the law.) What’ll you do if the arms come in while you’re sawing the bars of your cell?
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
* Those who are determined to be incapable of earning a livelihood because of a service-connected disability incurred in the line of duty in the armed forces.
* Veterans who served in a war theater during a time of war declared by Congress or were eligible for hostile fire special pay, were discharged or released from service in the armed forces under honorable conditions, and are determined to be incapable of earning a livelihood because of injuries, disease, or disability.
Two officers attempted to arrest her and a male companion for armed robbery.
In addition, the IRS has released Publication 3, "Armed Forces' Tax Guide," for use in preparing 2003 returns, available at: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p3.pdf.
He recalls that when Minin's plane landed at the airport, a team of heavily armed bodyguards would rush to greet it.
In addition, service in a combat zone includes any periods an armed forces member is absent from duty due to sickness, wounds, leave or internment by the enemy or other lawful cause.
government and consisting of 10,000 to 40,000 armed militia members who were African-American, you can bet they would have been investigated months ago, with many members arrested.
For many in the Croatian Armed Forces, the value of providing better training for it soldiers was based on bitter lessons learned from wartime experiences.
A better solution would be to halt military-to-military training until the Indonesian armed forces are firmly under the authority of the civilian government and demonstrate that they respect both the rule of law and the free market.
The values and assumptions that gave rise to the Second Amendment come from a world different from the one we inhabit, a world full of irrational hatreds, mortal dangers, and armed enemies.
But Spitzer explicitly rejects what he calls "the good guy-bad guy myth": the belief "that guns in the hands of good guys are good, whereas guns in the hands of bad guys are bad." Not surprisingly, he is hostile to the idea of armed self-defense.
A UN propaganda film entitled Armed to the Teeth informs the viewer that "legal" weapons are those "used by armies and police forces to protect us." The film denounces civilian ownership of firearms as "illegitimate" and insists that such "illicit" weapons "bring insecurity, pain, suffering and devastation." This view was enshrined as official UN policy in 'we the peoples,' Secretary-General Kofi Annan's official 2000 report.
Armed to the Teeth, a UN anti-gun propaganda video, takes the same approach.
These groups, according to press accounts, were preparing for armed clashes with their own government.