arm (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

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arm (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

1. To provide or equip someone, something, or oneself with weapons of some kind. Often used in passive constructions. They are arming the local militia with machine guns and grenades. The peasants were armed with pitchforks and scythes as they stormed the military garrison. It's a pretty cool robot, but why on earth did you arm it with a pair of flamethrowers?
2. To provide someone, something, or oneself with some necessary means of achieving victory. Often used in passive constructions. I try to arm my students with knowledge about how the world really works. We went into the trial armed with surveillance footage that proved the company's involvement in the incident.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

arm (someone against someone or something) (with something)

to equip someone with whatever is needed to fight against someone or something. They armed themselves against the enemy with guns and ammunition. The government armed the soldiers with the new guns.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

arm

n. a police officer. (see also long arm of the law.) What’ll you do if the arms come in while you’re sawing the bars of your cell?
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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