codfish aristocracy

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codfish aristocracy

A disparaging term for people who are recently rich. It was originally applied to the nouveau riche in 19th-century Boston. Primarily heard in US. I can't stand that members of the codfish aristocracy think that they belong at formal occasions with the more established families.
References in periodicals archive ?
We wonder whether the constitution has provisions guaranteeing this special treatment of the labour aristocracy.
A central issue that this book presents, one going back to the relation of modernity to the classics, is whether we can have an aristocracy without having something to be aristocratic about.
"Remarkably, despite a century of stories of ducal poverty and stately home demolitions, a third of Britain's land still belongs to the aristocracy and the Country Land and Business Association's 36,000 members own half the rural land in the country; nearly half of Scotland remains in the hands of 432 private individuals and companies, and more than a quarter of all Scottish estates larger than 5,000 acres are held by aristocratic families."
'Punjab's opportunistic aristocracy has brought up the issue to the court, but we - Sindh and KP - would use any strategy to foil the attempt,' he said.
This book presents GrundAEs Aristocracy in America; From the Sketch-book of a German Nobleman in its entirety, plus excerpts from The Americans in Their Moral, Social, and Political Relations, offering his observations on American political and social life.
Adams supported titles not, as critics charged, because he wished to foster an American aristocracy, but, instead, because he believed one would exist whether Americans liked it or not.
He used the gis to generate comparative charts plotting the transformation and migratory pathways of descendants of the medieval aristocracy that traced its origins to the first century.
But one wonders whether it was not in fact a perpetuation of the policies that James VI had begun in Scotland when he assumed personal rule in the early 1580s, henceforth forcing the old aristocracy to come to Edinburgh whilst at the same time adding new upwardly mobile crown servants to the mix.
An aristocracy is infinitely more skillful in the science of legislation than democracy can ever be...
To rectify this erroneous impression, her study covers aristocracy in England in the tenth and eleventh centuries.
The syndrome renders somatic and psychological the condition of the aristocracy, which is a class made up of individuals who do nothing: One does nothing to be an aristocrat and one does nothing as an aristocrat.
Polo, long associated with royalty, empire and aristocracy, was imported from India.
Nobody ever made that case, in a wholly nonpolemical way, as well as Walter Bagehot in The English Constitution, where he defends the aristocracy against its democratic critics.
She compares changes in scale in the late Roman and early medieval period in the Italian countryside and argues that the late antique aristocracy remained but became militarized, and that local churches were not randomly sited but instead the ecclesiastical network was planned.
Apart from Earl Spencer, there is hardly a member of the aristocracy. The old aristocracy is dead.