argue for

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argue for

1. To state reasons in support of someone or something. My mother has spent her life arguing for women's rights. She's my daughter—I will always argue for her.
2. To serve as evidence in support of something. Hinton's novel argues for an understanding of youth as a complex, traumatic time.
See also: argue

argue for someone or something

to make a case in favor of someone or something; to speak on behalf of someone or something in an argument. Are you prepared to argue strongly for this proposal? We will argue for our candidate in the debate.
See also: argue

argue for

v.
1. To put forth reasons supporting something; make a case for something: The students argued for a new gymnasium, but the administration did not want to spend the money needed to build it.
2. To act as evidence or support for something: These new facts argue for a different analysis. The fact that your route to work is so slow argues for giving my suggestion a try.
3. To speak on behalf of someone in an argument: Lawyers are supposed to argue for their clients.
See also: argue
References in periodicals archive ?
But in his most recent book, The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America, Jeffrey Rosen argues for another possibility: temperament.
In chapter one, Daniel Aiken argues for the single-elder-led-church model.
Reymond, chapter two argues for the presbytery-led church.
In debate 3, David Stoesz argues for the privatization of social services, whereas Ira C.
Foley, however, argues for a radically different model of the relationship between the Communist Party and leftist literary production.
In the fourth chapter, Beal argues for the importance of Sir Philip Sidney's letter to Queen Elizabeth, in which Sidney urges her to forego a marriage with the French Duc d'Alencon.
The author does not claim that she is wrong, but again and again argues for nuance.
And in his chapter on Volpone, Donaldson argues for a deep relation between the structural anomalies of Jonsonian comedic plots - especially that of Volpone - and "the mental, psychological, and moral state" of their characters (110).
Epstein argues for jettisoning the notion of completely rigid boundaries.
Although the Bear argues for a kind of natural connection between words and things, the meanings that he evokes are much more elusive, lack distinct boundaries, and are never fully present through the word.