argue the point

argue the point

To argue or debate a specific side or perspective of an issue at hand, often more for the sake of argument than a genuine attempt to persuade the opposing side. I know it is generally accepted that the book's story is a metaphor for capitalism, but I'd like to argue the point that the whole work is actually a satire. I'm not going to argue the point with you, Alex. We just don't see eye to eye.
See also: argue, point
References in periodicals archive ?
It would take a brave man to argue the point with Hearts' hulking target man but even Ikpeazu admits he doesn't have a leg to stand on when it comes to his penalty-kick prospects.
If you were at both checks it will be difficult to argue the point after the event.
The civil liberties brigade may argue the point but any scumbag who invades the home of a pensioner and assaults them deserves everything they get.
Today, we are united in our belief that we should remain in the EU but I have stopped attempting to argue the point with friends who hold an opposite view.
I did not argue the point and continued my journey.
You can argue the point, but American culture has changed by an avalanche of 11 million Hispanic and Asian immigrants.
But you would be in a better position to argue the point if you had been forthright in the first place.
I would not normally argue the point but I need my licence and no criminal record for work.
He added, 'If they are not prepared to do that and they want to argue the point, then I have to start down the road of investigating myself.'
Rather than argue the point, Andrews resigned as secretary and, since there were sufficient delegates present from CANAAC to form a quorum, his resignation was accepted and Dr.
When you receive a particularly negative response, such as "Doctors should never be sued," take the opportunity to draw in other jurors to argue the point for you.
But it will be a surprise if any track in these days of wall-to-wall racing comes out and publicly announces that this race-wrecker is not welcome as there just isn't the time or inclination for them to argue the point. Or is there?
If a gassed Kurd wants to call sarin or mustard gas a "weapon of mass destruction," I won't argue the point, nor would I push the issue with someone dying after an attack with militarized anthrax.
It would be difficult to argue the point with Aziz, and I didn't try.
But, as Robert Epstein of San Diego State University told Congressional Quarterly magazine, "There's going to be a day when a philosopher who has doubts [about a machine's intelligence] is going to argue the point with a machine, and that's when the argument will be over."