argue (someone or something) down

argue (someone or something) down

1. To successfully sway or influence someone who has an opposing viewpoint. They opposed this bill for so long that I'm amazed we were finally able to argue them down.
2. To successfully sway someone to lower the price of something. At a flea market, you can always try to argue the prices down. A: "He's asking $20 for it." B: "Try to argue him down to $10."
See also: argue, down
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

argue someone down

to defeat someone in a debate. Sally could always argue him down if she had to. She tries to argue down everyone she meets.
See also: argue, down

argue something down

 
1. Lit. to reduce something, such as a bill or a price, by arguing. I tried to argue the price down, but it did no good. Tom could not argue down the bill.
2. Fig. to urge the defeat of a proposal or a motion in a meeting through discussion. I am prepared to argue the proposal down in court. She will argue down the proposal in the council meeting.
See also: argue, down
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

argue down

v.
1. To end the opposition of someone or something by arguing strongly: He tried to object, but I argued him down. Our tax reform proposal was argued down by the committee.
2. To negotiate some lower price: The buyer argued me down to such a low price that I made no profit from the sale. If you want to buy that washing machine, I'm sure you can argue down the owner to half the price.
See also: argue, down
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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