argue


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argue the point

To argue or debate a specific side or perspective of an issue at hand, often more for the sake of argument than a genuine attempt to persuade the opposing side. I know it is generally accepted that the book's story is a metaphor for capitalism, but I'd like to argue the point that the whole work is actually a satire. I'm not going to argue the point with you, Alex. We just don't see eye to eye.
See also: argue, point

argue against

1. To state reasons in opposition to something. My uncle is an ardent liberal and argues against my mother's conservative beliefs every time they're together.
2. To serve as evidence in opposition to something. Hinton's novel argues against a simplistic understanding of teenage life in the 1960s.
See also: argue

argue back

To respond angrily or rudely at an inappropriate or unwelcome time. Don't argue back to me, young lady. Your students don't respect you, that's why they always argue back when you try to discipline them.
See also: argue, back

argue (someone or something) down

1. To successfully sway or influence someone who has an opposing viewpoint. They opposed this bill for so long that I'm amazed we were finally able to argue them down.
2. To successfully sway someone to lower the price of something. At a flea market, you can always try to argue the prices down. A: "He's asking $20 for it." B: "Try to argue him down to $10."
See also: argue, down

argue for

1. To state reasons in support of someone or something. My mother has spent her life arguing for women's rights. She's my daughter—I will always argue for her.
2. To serve as evidence in support of something. Hinton's novel argues for an understanding of youth as a complex, traumatic time.
See also: argue

argue (one) into

To convince someone to take a particular action. Can't you argue the salesman into giving us a better deal on the car? I'm sorry, but you can't argue me into voting for that candidate.
See also: argue

argue out

To discuss opposing views, with the goal of resolving a dispute. A noun is sometimes used between "argue" and "out." If you two ever hope to reconcile, you need to argue this out now. As a lawyer, I have listened to a lot of couples argue out the terms of their divorce.
See also: argue, out

argue the toss

To dispute something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Their decision to fire me was unfair, and I will argue the toss until the day I die!
See also: argue, toss

argue (one's) way out (of)

To escape a problem or punishment by a clever or otherwise effective argument or explanation. How did she argue her way out of yet another speeding ticket? I am absolutely furious with you; there is no way you can just argue your way out this time.
See also: argue, out, way

argue with

To debate or exchange opposing viewpoints on a particular topic with another person. I have been arguing with my brother about this for years—I doubt we will ever reach an agreement. Don't argue with your teacher, just do your homework as assigned.
See also: argue

arguing for the sake of arguing

Continuing a disagreement solely out of obstinacy. We have a potential compromise, so he's just arguing for the sake of arguing now.
See also: argue, of, sake

can't argue with that

A phrase used when one cannot or does not want to dispute what another person has said or suggested. Often said in appreciation of the argument or suggestion that has just been presented. A: "With all this rain, why don't we just stay in tonight?" B: "Can't argue with that—sure, let's see what's on TV."
See also: argue, that

argue against someone or something

 
1. Lit. [for someone] to make a case against someone or something; to oppose the choice of someone or something in an argument. I am preparing myself to argue against the case. Liz argued against Tom as the new president, but we chose him anyway.
2. Fig. [for something, such as facts] to support a case against someone or something in an argument; [for something, such as facts] to support a case against the choice of someone or something in an argument. I have uncovered something that argues against continuing this friendship. His own remarks argue against his qualifications for the office, but he probably will be elected anyway.
See also: argue

argue back

to argue with or oppose someone; to answer back (to someone); to talk back (to someone). (Usually said of persons who are supposed to listen and obey without comment.) Please don't argue back all the time. I wish you children did not argue back so much.
See also: argue, back

argue for someone or something

to make a case in favor of someone or something; to speak on behalf of someone or something in an argument. Are you prepared to argue strongly for this proposal? We will argue for our candidate in the debate.
See also: argue

argue one's way out of something

 and argue one's way out
to talk and get oneself free of a problem. You can't argue your way out of this! It's a problem, and there is no way that you can argue your way out.
See also: argue, of, out, way

argue someone down

to defeat someone in a debate. Sally could always argue him down if she had to. She tries to argue down everyone she meets.
See also: argue, down

argue someone into doing something

to convince or persuade someone to do something. She was unable to argue the manager into attending. She was unable to argue herself into doing something so unpleasant.
See also: argue

argue something down

 
1. Lit. to reduce something, such as a bill or a price, by arguing. I tried to argue the price down, but it did no good. Tom could not argue down the bill.
2. Fig. to urge the defeat of a proposal or a motion in a meeting through discussion. I am prepared to argue the proposal down in court. She will argue down the proposal in the council meeting.
See also: argue, down

argue something out

to settle something by discussing all the important points. We are going to have to argue this out some other time. Must we argue out every single detail of this contract?
See also: argue, out

argue (with someone) (over someone or something)

 and argue (with someone) (about someone or something)
to dispute or quarrel over someone or something with someone. Are you going to argue with her over something so simple? I wish you wouldn't argue over money with me. We always argue about who should drive. Don't argue with me!

argue with something

to challenge or dispute something; to dispute someone's statement of fact. I won't argue with your conclusions. It is not a good idea to argue with the facts.
See also: argue

arguing for the sake of arguing

 and arguing for the sake of argument
arguing simply to be difficult or contrary. You are just arguing for the sake ofarguing. You don't even know what the issue is. He is annoying, because he is always arguing for the sake of argument.
See also: argue, of, sake

(I) can't argue with that.

Inf. I agree with what you said.; It sounds like a good idea. Tom: This sure is good cake. Bob: Can't argue with that. Sue: What do you say we go for a swim? Fred: I can't argue with that.
See also: argue, that

argue the toss

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone argues the toss, they waste their time by arguing about something which is not important or which cannot be changed anyway. While London and Paris were still arguing the toss, the whole situation changed. He would wake suddenly, ready to argue the toss with anyone. Note: This may refer to someone tossing a coin in the air in order to reach a decision.
See also: argue, toss

argue the toss

dispute a decision or choice already made. informal, chiefly British
The toss in this phrase is the tossing of a coin to decide an issue in a simple and unambiguous way according to the side of the coin visible when it lands.
See also: argue, toss

ˌargue the ˈtoss

(British English, informal) continue to disagree about a decision, especially when it is too late to change it or it is not very important: Look, just do it your way. I’ve got better things to do than stand here all day arguing the toss with you.
See also: argue, toss

argue against

v.
1. To present reasons opposing something; make a case against something: In my history paper, I argued against the idea that we could have won the war.
2. To act as evidence against something: There are some new scientific discoveries that argue against earlier ideas about the growth of cells.
See also: argue

argue down

v.
1. To end the opposition of someone or something by arguing strongly: He tried to object, but I argued him down. Our tax reform proposal was argued down by the committee.
2. To negotiate some lower price: The buyer argued me down to such a low price that I made no profit from the sale. If you want to buy that washing machine, I'm sure you can argue down the owner to half the price.
See also: argue, down

argue for

v.
1. To put forth reasons supporting something; make a case for something: The students argued for a new gymnasium, but the administration did not want to spend the money needed to build it.
2. To act as evidence or support for something: These new facts argue for a different analysis. The fact that your route to work is so slow argues for giving my suggestion a try.
3. To speak on behalf of someone in an argument: Lawyers are supposed to argue for their clients.
See also: argue

argue with

v.
1. To engage in an argument or quarrel with someone: I argue with my brothers and sisters all the time about who should wash the dishes.
2. To challenge or dispute something: It is difficult to argue with your conclusions, but I still feel that you are not taking all of the facts into account.
See also: argue
References in periodicals archive ?
Foley, however, argues for a radically different model of the relationship between the Communist Party and leftist literary production.
Few argue the destructive effects of leaving children to languish in the fractured foster care system.
It is not, however, convincing to argue that al-Afghani's pan-Islamism was a reflection of the exigencies of the anti-imperialist struggle.
Indeed, the case of the silicone gel breast implant argues persuasively that patients who receive such devices and payers who reimburse for them should insist that the burden of proof for establishing the safety and effectiveness of health care technologies liw with the manufacturers who market new devices and with the health practitioners who advocate and expose patients to new procedures.
It could be, she argues, a site of power and resistance.
If the advances occur at the end of the year and the repayment occurs shortly after the start of the next year, the IRS may argue the advance is a sham to generate a tax loss and disregard the entire transaction.
These CATO scholars actually argue that a nuclear Korea or Japan or Taiwan may not be a bad idea.
Many philosophers, including Dennett, argue that humans should be regarded as responsible agents even if human behavior is fully determined.
Because elite women managed familial assets during their husbands' frequent absences, Harris argues persuasively that men had much incentive to treat their wives not as their minions, but "as de facto, if junior, partners in the family enterprise" (8).
In the second debate, Jon Meyer and Stephen Erich argue on the issue: "Should the federal government fund faith-based social service organizations?
The IRS and taxpayers have disputed the appropriate tax treatment of these warrants--while taxpayers argue they should be treated as sales discounts, the IRS claims they should be capitalized.
Several chapters in this volume argue persuasively that the application of precaution is complex and context-specific, which precludes a single, simple definition of the requirements of the PP.
For example, Paul Smith uses a detailed analysis of the practices of Tommy Hiltiger to argue that the fashion industry is not simply responding to increased demand for products but is also manufacturing that demand.
First, modern popes and church documents argue that a fundamental reason for reserving ordination to males is the "example recorded in the sacred scriptures of Christ choosing his apostles only from among men" [read males].
In the post-war years, politicians who supported the war used the idea of mass public enthusiasm for the war to argue that they were merely following public opinion.