arch

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arch cove

obsolete The leader of a male band of thieves or gypsies. The arch cove kept the audience dazzled and distracted while his gang went through and pickpocketed the crowd.
See also: arch, cove

arch dell

obsolete The leader of a female band of thieves or gypsies, who acts as an accomplice to her male counterpart, an "arch cove" or "arch rogue." The women of the traveling group remain insular and secretive, led by the arch dell in their pursuits.
See also: arch

arch doxy

obsolete The leader of a female band of thieves or gypsies, who acts as an accomplice to her male counterpart, an "arch cove" or "arch rogue." The beguiling women put on a fantastic show of exotic dance, while their arch doxy secured "donations" from the audience.
See also: arch, doxy

arch rogue

obsolete The leader of a male band of thieves or gypsies. While one should be wary of the traveling group, the arch rogue who orchestrates them is especially dangerous.
See also: arch, rogue

arch over

To bend over or form an archway over. This phrase can be applied to people and things, and a noun can be used between "arch" and "over." Arching yourself over like this helps to stretch the back muscles. We all held flowers and arched them over the graduates during the procession. The flowers arched over the happy couple beautifully as they stood before the minister.
See also: arch, over

arch (oneself) over

to bend or curve over. (Oneself includes itself.) The tree arched over in the wind. Arch yourself over gracefully and then straighten up. The tree arched itself over in the windstorm.
See also: arch, over

arch over someone or something

to bend or curve over someone or something; to stand or remain bent or curved over someone or something. The trees arched gracefully over the walkway. A lovely bower of roses arched over the bride.
See also: arch, over

arch something over someone or something

to place something above someone or something to form an arch or archway. The cadets arched their swords over the bridal couple. The willow arched its long drooping branches over the tiny cabin.
See also: arch, over
References in periodicals archive ?
Beneath the nicknames, the teasing, the bad-Dickensian archness of her letters to him--"Hoi know oi is er very bad woifie boot oi looves yew very mooch hoondemeath," and so on--one can feel her helplessness.
The show trades largely on its naughtiness which just about sustains the two-hour run although I found the archness of some of the humour a bit cringe-making.
The flag and its stories of valour and honour offer a "comforting feeling of rootedness, historical continuity, and cultural integrity," a safe harbour in the storm of "cynicism, archness, and pervasive lack of seriousness, commitment, and authenticity they feel characterize their own age" (p.
Oliver Twist uses various comic devices (irony, satire, comic archness, comic exposure, etc.
If there is genuine surprise beneath the smokescreen of archness, it might be interpreted as, "Why haven't I met you yet?
And also I think that costume dramas have gotten sort of hoary, whereas the archness and the extremeness--especially of certain animators--I adore some of that stuff.
As with all such endeavours, this is a book best approached in instalments; its unremitting archness is a bit wearing otherwise.
With their large heads, they appear ungainly and their stances contrived, but perhaps not so offensive as to warrant the tirade meted out to them by the ceramic scholar Arthur Lane, who felt that 'The smirking archness of their expressions is at Bristol even more objectionable than at Derby, owing to the large scale and coarsening of detail.
While modernist irony is pervaded by a sense of nostalgia, of loss and longing that lies beneath the surface archness, postmodernist irony is more about "play," both in the sense of enjoyment and in the poststructuralist sense of a production of possibilities of interpretation without end or definitive resolution.
You won't encounter many schools, fronts, or manifestos among artists today, the dominant sensibility being a mix of archness and cool irony, leaving little room for passion or aesthetic convictions.
The second time I watched the Tenenbaums, the young-adult archness seemed to me like Eli's prep-school outfit, which he wears until far too late in life.
She combines this with an annoying, Henry James-like archness in which every other word seemingly appears in quotation marks--"regime," "culture," "state," "illegitimacy," "security," "institutions"--and nagging little factual errors, such as identifying former US Defense Secretary James Schlesinger as Secretary of State and her bewildering assertion that the French forces committed to Desert Storm--whose ground elements, for instance, acted under the tactical control of the XVIII Airborne Corps--operated independently of the Americans.
Outside in all weathers, Mary "grew browner and browner, and more indelibly freckled"; her "splendid hazel eyes" had a "dancing light," a "vivacity and archness of expression"; and she dotes on her brother, her life "all gladness" when he is at home (pp.
a luxuriant-looking woman of brilliant talent, great archness of manner, black eyes and raven hair,' as her portraits show her to have been in her youth.