the apple does not fall far from the tree

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the apple does not fall far from the tree

Said when someone is displaying traits or behaving in the same way as their relatives (especially parents). Did you hear that Dr. Klein's daughter Molly is majoring in Biology? I guess the apple does not fall far from the tree.
See also: apple, does, fall, far, not, tree

the apple doesn’t fall/never falls far from the ˈtree

(saying, especially American English) a child usually behaves in a similar way to his or her parent(s): ‘You have an adorable daughter.’ ‘Ah, well, you know what they say. The apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree.’
See also: apple, fall, far, never, tree
References in periodicals archive ?
THEY say the apple doesn't fall far from the tree and when it comes to Kerry Katona's youngest daughter Dylan-Jorge that's definitely true.
The apple doesn't fall far from the tree as his father Julio was a legendary international star during the 1970s and 1980s.
Referring to Henrik's iconic celebration, Jordan added: "The apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
THEY say the apple doesn't fall far from the tree and that's definitely true for supermodel Cindy Crawford and her 15-year old daughter, Kaia.
People say that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
While most of the time the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, every now and then an exceptional child is born.
You can see with his parents that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
And proving that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, tearaway Jodie soon becomes embroiled in a relationship with Max's right-hand man Darren Miller.
And proving the apple doesn't fall far from the tree tearaway Jodie soon becomes embroiled in a relationship with Max's right-hand man Darren Miller.
The apple doesn't fall far from the tree, so when I saw the television ads run on WMUR by the Employee Freedom Action Committee, I started to wonder.
It seems the apple doesn't fall far from the tree after all.
In the fictional Cooper, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
It's coming to something when two grandmothers can't safely go for a walk in the evening, and doubtless if we had gone to speak to the parents we would have got a mouthful of abuse from them also, because an apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
But the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, and sis's enlightened activism might be only a new twist on an old familial distortion.
We need more information, because the apple doesn't fall far from the tree - and in the case of ``The Weather Man,'' the boy is anything but golden.