appeal

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curb appeal

The external attractiveness of a building or property, such as can be viewed from the street (i.e., the curb). We were suckered into buying the house because of its incredible curb appeal, but once we moved in, we realized just how run-down it was inside.
See also: appeal, curb

street appeal

The external attractiveness of a building or property, such as can be viewed from the street. We were suckered into buying the house because of its incredible street appeal, but once we moved in, we realized just how run-down it was inside.
See also: appeal, street

appeal against

To attempt to change a legal decision. Don't worry, we will appeal against the judge's sentence.
See also: appeal

appeal to

1. To ask for something, usually in an urgent or pleading manner Appeal to your congressmen if you really want lower taxes.
2. To spark one's interest or appreciation. Tall, dark-haired guys always appeal to me. That style of architecture just doesn't appeal to me.
3. To resonate with one's specific interests or feelings. The beauty of her prose appeals to my poetic sensibilities. The idea of stronger laws for criminals appeals to me as a mother.
See also: appeal

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

To urge one to rethink something. The phrase refers to King Philip II of Macedon, who handed down an unwelcome decision and was challenged with an appeal to "Philip sober." If you're unhappy with his decision, then why don't you appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober?
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

appeal to Caesar

To direct a plea to the most powerful person in a particular setting or situation. No one else has the authority to overturn this decision—you'll have to appeal to Caesar on this one.
See also: appeal, caesar

on appeal

As a result of an appeal to a higher court. Her conviction was overturned on appeal.
See also: appeal, on

appeal against something

to ask a court of appeals to change a ruling made by a lower court. My lawyer appealed against the judgment. We will file an appeal against the court ruling.
See also: appeal

appeal (to a court) (for something)

to plead to a court of appeals for a favorable ruling. She appealed to the court fora retrial. She appealed for an injunction to the circuit court. She appealed for a retrial.

appeal to someone

to please or attract someone. Fast food doesn't appeal to me. The idea of a vacation to Florida this winter appeals to me a lot.
See also: appeal

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

ask someone to reconsider, with the suggestion that an earlier opinion or decision represented only a passing mood.
This phrase comes from an anecdote told by the Roman historian and moralist Valerius Maximus concerning an unjust judgement given by King Philip of Macedon : the woman condemned by Philip declared that she would appeal to him once again, but this time when he was sober.
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

appeal to Caesar

appeal to the highest possible authority.
The allusion is to the claim made by the apostle Paul to have his case heard in Rome, which was his right as a Roman citizen: ‘I appeal unto Caesar’ (Acts 25:11).
See also: appeal, caesar

appeal to

v.
1. To make an earnest or urgent request to someone or something: The citizens appealed to their mayor to try to find a solution to the housing crisis.
2. To be interesting or attractive to someone: This new style of clothing doesn't appeal to me; I prefer the older fashion.
See also: appeal

on appeal

In the process of being appealed; while being appealed.
See also: appeal, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, appealers who reported having no payee, about 10% of the sample, were almost three times as likely to have their appeal approved as were those who had a payee.
More recently, the `revisionists' in Britain, such as Maurice Cowling and John Charnley, have glibly argued that Chamberlain and the other Appealers were the last British practitioners of Realpolitik.
You can't be labor negotiators, tax appealers, systems analysts, financial reporters .
The most common ones employed with requests are those of (i) hesitators, (ii) cajolers, (iii) appealers, and (iv) attention-getters.
Trosborg (1995) has referred to both cajolers and appealers as interpersonal markers.
Branch chairman Philip Wilson said: "With many appealers retiring, we need to find people of the younger generations who are willing to continue their good work.