appeal to Caesar

appeal to Caesar

To direct a plea to the most powerful person in a particular setting or situation. No one else has the authority to overturn this decision—you'll have to appeal to Caesar on this one.
See also: appeal, caesar

appeal to Caesar

appeal to the highest possible authority.
The allusion is to the claim made by the apostle Paul to have his case heard in Rome, which was his right as a Roman citizen: ‘I appeal unto Caesar’ (Acts 25:11).
See also: appeal, caesar
References in periodicals archive ?
As great and influential a writer as he was, Orwell could not hold a candle to the Apostle Paul who, in his appeal to Caesar, said, "if I ...
Paul's bold assertion that the (pagan) "powers that be" were "ordained of God" and his fateful decision in a tight spot to appeal to Caesar followed quite logically.
Rescued by Roman soldiers, he goes through a complex series of interrogations, plots, and trials, and a long imprisonment in Caesarea, before finally being forced to appeal to Caesar. Now he sets out for Rome, but ironically as a Roman prisoner.
That this is Luke's aim in recounting Paul's 'appeal to Caesar' in 25-26 is further reinforced by the impression of Paul's wealth (being able to pay for his travel expenses) and by the way he is treated by the ship's crew, the Maltese leaders, the welcoming deputation, and the Jewish leaders at Rome (27-28).
Writing in The Forum (December 1888), Tourgee stated his conviction that American literature had become "distinctly Confederate in sympathy." Among his other books are Figs and Thistles (1879), <IR> HOT PLOUGHSHARES </IR> (1883), An Appeal to Caesar (1884), Button's Inn (1887), and Pactolus Prime (1890).