appeal to


Also found in: Legal.

appeal to

1. To ask for something, usually in an urgent or pleading manner Appeal to your congressmen if you really want lower taxes.
2. To spark one's interest or appreciation. Tall, dark-haired guys always appeal to me. That style of architecture just doesn't appeal to me.
3. To resonate with one's specific interests or feelings. The beauty of her prose appeals to my poetic sensibilities. The idea of stronger laws for criminals appeals to me as a mother.
See also: appeal

appeal to someone

to please or attract someone. Fast food doesn't appeal to me. The idea of a vacation to Florida this winter appeals to me a lot.
See also: appeal

appeal to

v.
1. To make an earnest or urgent request to someone or something: The citizens appealed to their mayor to try to find a solution to the housing crisis.
2. To be interesting or attractive to someone: This new style of clothing doesn't appeal to me; I prefer the older fashion.
See also: appeal
References in classic literature ?
In the second place, we are all equally desirous--whatever difference of opinion may otherwise exist--to make this informal inquiry a means, if possible, of avoiding the painful publicity which would result from an appeal to a Court of Law.
If the result, so far, fails to satisfy us in that particular, we shall not hesitate to appeal to a Court of Law.
He asked leave to appeal to Geoffrey to confirm him.
The marriage which they deny I am now waiting to prove--not by assertion, on my side, but by appeal to competent witnesses.
But he found himself encompassed with guards and forced to remain silent while the Chief Circle in a few impassioned words made a final appeal to the Women, exclaiming that, if the Colour Bill passed, no marriage would henceforth be safe, no woman's honour secure; fraud, deception, hypocrisy would pervade every household; domestic bliss would share the fate of the Constitution and pass to speedy perdition.
Affirming the decision of the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court held that, 'By section 233 (2) of the 1999 Constitution (as amended), appeals from the Court of Appeal to this court lies only against the decisions of that court.
Both the certification request to the lower court and the petition for direct appeal to the court of appeals should include enough information to allow the court to determine whether to allow the direct appeal.
With respect to the due process argument, ICLTC argued that the rules limit the right to an administrative appeal to a small class of cases in which certain categories of sanctions--termination, denial of payment for new admissions, and civil monetary penalties--were meted out.
A lot of people in Congress think a stronger and faster appeals process, including the right to appeal to an outside party if you don't like the health plan's decision, would solve many of the problems before they get to the courts.