apothecary

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apothecary's Latin

obsolete Latin that has been badly mangled or jumbled, either unintentionally through bad translation or intentionally for the sake of humor. Also known as Law Latin, Dog Latin, or Bog Latin. He only spent a year learning Latin, so now he just mutters apothecary's Latin to sound more learned than he is.

talk like an apothecary

obsolete To chatter on in a foolishly pedantic manner. The playwright wants to assume his work speaks to the most educated of society, but in truth, each character talks like an apothecary, and their dialogue so fumbling and convoluted as to be laughable.
See also: apothecary, like, talk
References in periodicals archive ?
(16) On this and the frequent conflicts between apothecaries and physicians, see Hope et al.
With the passage of the Apothecaries Act in 1815, the training of apothecaries became linked with the professional training of surgeons (as in Keats's case), and the surgeon-apothecary "seemed perfectly tailored to meet the wide-ranging needs of a public who could afford a single, reasonably cheap, multi-purpose practitioner" (Porter 127).
read both, he wound up translating them into English for the benefit of his fellow apothecaries (whose ranks he never officially joined).
There was a shop on the north-west corner of the site, as well as a laboratory, a warehouse, offices, committee rooms, a library, and an oak-panelled Great Hall for the assembled apothecaries. This latter room is magnificent, with a carved screen, an overhanging minstrel's gallery, and an imposing eighteenth-century candelabrum.
Merz Apothecary is one of the country's oldest pharmacies and natural health apothecaries. Merz has two locations in Chicago, IL selling an international variety of health and beauty products, ranging from vitamins, supplements and herbal teas to soaps, skin care products and fragrance.
However, her life straddles the tense juncture between three professions: university-trained doctors, surgeons who learn their trade on the battlefield, and the apothecaries. It is upon this landscape that Lilly finds her true place in the world.
In the Middle Ages, merchants in apothecaries often dispensed mumia, or bitumen, a black, asphaltlike substance thought at the time to alleviate ailments as diverse as epilepsy, gout, and plague.
Bigelow Apothecaries entered a strategic partnership in December intended to capitalize on the relative strengths of each company in the beauty industry.
Editors Victoria Burke and Elizabeth Clarke attribute her manuscript's survival to its dedication to two prominent London apothecaries. They pursue clues to Palmer's identity, family ties, and religious alignment through directories of learned societies, parish records, and state papers to place her in London during a crucial two years, 1671-73, in the Restoration context of the Declaration of Indulgence (1672) and during the years in which the Crown sought the cooperation of dissenters in tolerating a war with the Dutch.
On the other hand it might have been an ingenious scheme to relieve pressure on the NHS in Wales by persuading people to help fund the alternative medicine of the apothecaries of Middleton.
O'Day challenges the traditional belief that there were sharp and insurmountable distinctions among physicians, surgeons and apothecaries. The training of the physicians at Oxford and Cambridge was not so exclusively theoretical as was thought, since many of them had studied abroad and most attached themselves to practitioners and learned on the job, just like the surgeons and apothecaries.
In more recent studies, early modem hospitals are seen as having had multiple functions, with a great variety of actors including lay and ecclesiastical nurses, administrators, apothecaries, surgeons, and patients all of whom helped to shape the institutions.
Nutton's fifth chapter treats the medical school of Salemo and the impact of Greek and Arab medical text translations, the rise of university medicine and the professional pyramid, which included the learned physicians but also surgeons, apothecaries, and unlearned healers.
One advantage Chinese archaeologists have in locating the teeth of creatures such as Gigantopithecus is that these remains often turn up in the shops of apothecaries. The teeth are collected by peasants who quarry fossil-containing caves on what are called "dragon bone hills." They then trade them to druggists, who grind the paleontological treasures into a powder or paste long considered by Chinese folklore to have medicinal properties.
Splintering into physicians, surgeons, and apothecaries, they, too, organized and indulged in self-regulation to escape the opprobrium of quackery.