ape

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Related to aper: Apr, APERC

ape (one's) behavior

To mimic the behavior of one, generally in a mocking or derisive manner. It is pretty standard now for comedians to ape the president's behavior and manner of speech.
See also: ape, behavior

ape hangers

slang Tall, angled handlebars on a motorcycle. I like how ape hangers look, but they make my arms go numb after awhile.
See also: ape, hanger

ape leader

obsolete A pejorative term for an older single woman; a spinster or old maid. From an old proverb that women who die unmarried are fated to lead apes—considered at the time to be unproductive animals—in hell. At the risk of being labeled an ape leader by ignorant people, I have chosen a life without marriage, and I am perfectly happy to do so.
See also: ape, leader

aped

slang Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really aped!
See also: ape

go ape

1. slang To become wildly or uncontrollably angry. My parents went totally ape when they found out I'd wrecked the car! Now, don't go ape or anything, but I've decided to move to Canada.
2. slang To become extremely excited or enthusiastic (about something). I've never understood that pop star's popularity, but kids just go ape over her music.
See also: ape, go

go ape over (someone or something)

1. slang To become wildly or uncontrollably angry about someone or something. My parents went totally ape over the news that I'd wrecked the car! Now, don't go ape over it, but I've decided to move to Canada.
2. slang To become extremely excited or enthusiastic about someone or something. I've never understood that pop star's popularity, but kids just go ape over her.
See also: ape, go, over

go ape (over someone or something)

Sl. to become very excited over something. I just go ape over chocolate. Sam went ape over Mary.
See also: ape, go

go ape

Become wildly excited or enthusiastic. For example, The audience went ape over the band. This idiom is a modern version of the older go berserk. It fancifully equates frenzy with an ape's behavior. [Second half of 1900s] Also see go bananas.
See also: ape, go

go ape

INFORMAL
If someone goes ape, they start to behave in an uncontrolled way, usually because they are very excited or very angry. The crowd went ape. Is he never tempted to break away, to go ape for a period? Note: You can also say that someone goes ape crazy. You don't get the chance to go ape crazy. Note: You can also say that someone goes apeshit. If we mentioned her ex-husband, she would literally go apeshit. Note: People who behave in a violent or uncontrolled way are being compared with apes.
See also: ape, go

go ape

go wild; become violently excited. informal
Originally mid 20th-century North American slang, this expression possibly refers to the 1933 movie King Kong, which stars a giant ape-like monster.
See also: ape, go

go ˈape

(also go ˈapeshit taboo) (slang, especially American English) become extremely angry or excited: The manager went ape when the team lost yet another game.
See also: ape, go

ape

n. a hoodlum or strong-arm man, especially if big and strong. (Underworld.) Tell your ape to let me go!

ape hangers

n. long steering handles on a bicycle or motorcycle. Who is that guy riding the bike with ape hangers?
See also: ape, hanger

aped

(ept)
mod. alcohol intoxicated. I’ve never seen my brother so totally aped before.
See also: ape

go ape (over someone/something)

in. to become very excited over someone or something. I just go ape over chocolate.
See also: ape, go, over, someone, something

go ape

verb
See also: ape, go

go ape

Informal
To become wildly excited or angry: went ape at the party; went ape when she saw the parking ticket.
See also: ape, go

go ape, to

To act frenzied with delight, fury, or some other strong emotion. Why such behavior should be described as apelike is not known. The slangy term dates from about 1950 and is used in such contexts as “The audience went ape over the new jazz combo,” or “The school board goes ape over the very mention of budget cuts.” A related and possibly derivative cliché is to go bananas, with roughly the same meaning. It dates from the 1960s. The National Public Radio show All Things Considered had it: “When you mention the word ‘nuclear,’ people start to go bananas” (April 13, 1983). See also go ballistic.
See also: go
References in periodicals archive ?
aper however the monthly oscillations in GSI values show similarities for both sexes.
(5.) Marcus Aper, originary from Galia, influent lawyer, former praetor, he is the defender of the newer eloquence, 1st Century BC.
Abbreviations: ANOVA, analysis of variance; APER, apparent error rate; ET, evapotranspiration; KBG, Kentucky bluegrass; LOER, leave-one-out error rate.
aper month One thing, however, is certain - there is little money available.
1899 a Royal Horticultural aper by John Basham of Monmouthshire, described acres of orchards in the UK, 30% were in the Welsh Marches.
Children have had the opportunity to use drills, sandpS aper and paintbrushes.
PREHUMAN An obscure poly DA, aper 'n' hum near hump (Unhamper human rep!) (Apers "ape" Mr.
Hehas constantly insisted he wants to see the club's ambition matching his ownbeforeheputs pen top aper on the new contract offer.
A poll for a Sunday news aper showed the Tories neck-and-neck with the Liberal Democrats.
Delegates from the nine LGAs that make up the Senatorial District have reconvened at the Aper Aku stadium Makurdi to commence voting.
With Londoner Anne Londoner An Keothavong losing earlier in vong losing the day, to follow Elena , to follow El Baltacha, Melanie South, Katie O'Brien and Laura 'Brien and La Robson out of the Championships, the results onships, the do little to support L to support T A chief executive R aper's oger Dra upbeat comments on the comments o state of British tennis.
And it emerged yesterday another picture of her during the dispute was published in a German newsp aper.
''People who know Henrik will not be surprised to learn that hep la ns to give aper cent age of the profits to charity.''
NEWSP APER editors yesterday mounted a stout defence of the work of the Press Complaints Commission in helping raise standards through self regulation over the last decade.