anybody


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anyone in their right mind

Anyone of a sound, rational mind. Usually used to set up a context in which any sane person would or could do, say, or think a certain thing. Anyone in their right mind can see that poverty affects the entire world.
See also: anyone, mind, right

anyone who is anybody

All the most famous or important people in society. Usually used to indicate something as being glamorous, trendy, or chic, which all such famous people have, do, or are attending. I hear that the gala in New York City is going to be a star-studded event. Anyone who is anybody will be there!
See also: anybody, anyone, who

anybody who is anybody

Anyone of fame or high social status. If we want to find a financial backer, we have to go to the gala tonight—anybody who is anybody will be there.
See also: anybody, who

anyone I know?

Who? The phrase can be an innocent question or have a suggestive or coy undertone. A: "Some guys from class will be at the party tonight." B: "Oh really? Anyone I know?" A: "I hear you've begun dating again. Anyone I know?" B: "You know Stan and I are back together, stop pretending you don't."
See also: anyone

be anybody's/anyone's guess

To be uncertain or unknown. Why dogs and cats hate each other is anybody's guess. No one has been able to determine why my daughter has been having nightmares—apparently, it's anybody's guess.
See also: guess

run up

1. verb To hoist or raise something, especially a flag. A noun or pronoun can be used between "run" and "up." Make sure the flag does not touch the ground as you run it up in the mornings.
2. verb To accumulate a large bill or debt that one is obliged to pay. We ran up a huge bill staying in that luxury resort in Las Vegas, but Jake insisted on paying for it. Apparently, he ran up a lot of credit card debts that he couldn't pay off, so he slipped across the border to Canada.
3. verb To cause the value of something to increase. A noun or pronoun can be used between "run" and "up." News of the company doubling production of their very popular tablet device has run their shares up to record highs.
4. verb To run and stop in front of someone or something. I just saw the neighbor kid run up and ring our doorbell. She ran up to me and gave me a huge hug.
5. verb In sports, to continue adding to one's score despite an assured victory due to a large lead, a practice considered poor sportsmanship. They're already ahead by 30, and now they're just running up the score.
6. noun An increase, perhaps a rapid or sudden one. Experts are attributing the run-up in price to a sudden surge in demand.
7. noun The period of time before an event or occurrence. There was no shortage of predictions in the run-up to the election.
See also: run, up

anyone's game

A game that anyone could potentially win (because neither person or side has an advantage). It's anyone's game—all we need is one goal to get the win!
See also: game

anybody's/anyone's guess

Uncertain or unknown. Why dogs and cats hate each other is anybody's guess. No one has been able to determine why my daughter has been having nightmares—apparently, it's anybody's guess.
See also: guess

a little (hard) work never killed anybody

Doing hard, arduous work won't have any ill effects on a person, and, in fact, it is often beneficial to them. I told Mrs. Smith that you would help clean out her attic, and I don't want to hear any complaints about it—a little work never killed anybody. I think it would be good for Sarah to get a job this summer. A little hard work never killed anybody, after all.

a little (hard) work never hurt anybody

Doing hard, arduous work won't have any ill effects on a person, and, in fact, it is often beneficial to them. I told Mrs. Smith that you would help clean out her attic, and I don't want to hear any complaints about it—a little work never hurt anybody. I think it would be good for Sarah to get a job this summer. A little hard work never hurt anybody, after all.
See also: anybody, hurt, little, never, work

it's anybody's/anyone's guess

It is uncertain or unknown. Why do dogs and cats hate each other? Well, it's anybody's guess. No one has been able to determine why my daughter has been having nightmares—apparently, it's anyone's guess.
See also: guess

Anyone I know?

 and Anybody I know?
a coy way of asking who? Sally: Where were you last night? Jane: I had a date. Sally: Anyone I know? Bill: I've got a date for the formal next month. Henry: Anybody I know?
See also: anyone

It's anybody's guess

No one knows, so anyone's guess is as good as anyone else's. A: When will the messenger be here? B: It's anybody's guess.
See also: guess

run something up

 
1. Lit. to raise or hoist something, such as a flag. Harry ran the flag up the flagpole each morning. Will you please run up the flag today?
2. Fig. to cause something to go higher, such as the price of stocks or commodities. A rumor about higher earnings ran the price of the computer stocks up early in the afternoon. They ran up the price too high.
3. Fig. to accumulate indebtedness. I ran up a huge phone bill last month. Walter ran up a bar bill at the hotel that made his boss angry.
4. to stitch something together quickly. She's very clever. I'm sure she can run up a costume for you. The seamstress ran up a party dress in one afternoon.
See also: run, up

run up (to someone or something)

to run as far as someone or something and stop; to run to the front of someone or something. I ran up to the mailman and said hello to him. I ran up and said hello.
See also: run, up

run up

1. Make or become greater or larger, as in That offer will run up the price of the stock. [Late 1500s]
2. Accumulate, as in She ran up huge bills at the florist. [First half of 1700s]
3. Sew rapidly, as in I can run up some new curtains for the kitchen. [Mid-1800s]
4. Raise a flag, as in Let's run up the flag in time for the holiday. This usage, originating in the navy about 1900, gave rise to the slangy phrase, Let's run it up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes, meaning, "Let's try this out." The latter originated about 1960 as advertising jargon.
See also: run, up

be anybody's guess

or

be anyone's guess

If you say that something is anybody's guess or is anyone's guess, you mean that it is impossible to know what is true or what will happen. How she managed to stay there for an entire month was anybody's guess. How long the fuel would last was anyone's guess.
See also: guess

anyone's game

an evenly balanced contest.
See also: game

ˈanybody’s/ˈanyone’s guess

(informal) nobody knows: Who will win the next game is anybody’s guess.
See also: guess

run up

v.
1. To cause some debt to accumulate: Don't run up such a big bill next time you go out to eat! He has been running a large debt up for months.
2. To increase some value: The craze for this company's stock will run up its price. The bidders ran the price up to $100.
See also: run, up
References in classic literature ?
"Because I don't expect anybody would believe me if I did," replies the old fellow calmly, and without even a tinge of bitterness in his tone, as he refills his pipe, and requests the landlord to bring him three of Scotch, cold.
"No," he continues thoughtfully; "I shouldn't believe it myself if anybody told it to me, but it's a fact, for all that.
"It doth -- anybody that is of lofty birth; and the better if he be royal."
"Oh, anybody can run a tick down that don't belong to them.
But while Bogie insists his side are a "match for anybody", he knows only sustained success will win over the critics.
Anybody who may have witnessed the damage being caused, or anybody who may have information is asked to contact officers at Pwllheli Police Station by dialling 101, if within Wales.
Does anybody recognise anybody else on the photograph?
He said: "It was disappointing not to score but the team did really well so we shouldn't blame anybody. If anybody is to blame, it's me."
A Royal Mail spokesman said: "Neither the postman or the customer saw anybody take the mail.
"It's a brilliant idea and I would urge anybody who has an air gun to hand it in so nobody else gets hurt.
Anybody who can play a woodwind instrument, brass, or percussion, is asked to contribute.
Nanny is, "Uh-uh, I'm going to start my own business, 'cause I'm not going to be victimized by anybody."
DOES anybody really believe Blair when he says the Black Watch will be home for Christmas?
Charity workers areappealing for anybody who could help to come forward.
Bush honestly believes that he doesn't "owe anybody an explanation" for his decisions, he perjured himself at his inauguration when he took a solemn oath, before God, to "preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States." By this act President Bush attested that he would subordinate himself to the Constitution, and that he answers to the American people for the exercise of his limited powers.