ante


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ante in

1. To pay the necessary fee to enter into some competitive activity, especially a card game (usually poker). A less common variant of "ante up." I like to play poker with my buddies, but I don't like having to ante in each time when I know I'm going to lose. Everyone ante in so we can start playing already!
2. To pay the money one owes for something. I can't believe we have to ante in $250 for this trip. The company said it was no longer willing to ante in such a large sum for returns that were ultimately not guaranteed.
See also: ante

ante up

1. Said as an imperative at the start of a round of poker when each player contributes money to the total that the winner will receive. Ante up, so we can start playing.
2. To pay money for something, often begrudgingly. I can't believe we have to ante up $25 a piece just to see a movie. You lost the bet, so ante up!
3. To fund a particular project or goal. So many donors anted up for our fundraiser that we can repair the school's heating system and the gymnasium.
See also: ante, up

penny ante

Having little or no significance or worth. They seem to think this penny ante increase to the minimum wage is some kind of massive victory that will change everyone's lives for the better. My wife always comes back from our vacations with a bag full of penny ante trinkets that get thrown out a year later.
See also: ante, penny

raise the ante

To increase the level of something, often one related to money. I'm going to raise the ante and threaten them a little so that they finally pay up. Sellers have raised the ante in this area so much that first-time buyers can no longer afford it.
See also: ante, raise

up the ante

1. To raise the stakes in a betting game. I didn't planning on betting so much until Jason upped the ante on us.
2. To increase the level of something, often one related to money. I'm just going to threaten them a little and up the ante so that they finally pay up. Sellers have upped the ante in this area so much that first-time buyers can no longer afford it.
See also: ante, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

up the ante

 and raise the ante 
1. Fig. to raise the opening stakes in a betting game. Pete upped the ante on that the poker game to $100 per hand. Don't up the ante any more. You're betting far too much money already.
2. Fig. to increase a price. (Fig. on {2}.) Sensing how keen the people looking at the house were, Jerry upped the ante another $5,000. "Don't try to up the ante on us," said the man, "We know what the asking price is."
See also: ante, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ante up

Pay what is due, contribute; by extension, do one's share. For example, The trustees were asked to ante up $10,000 each for the new scholarship, or Tired of watching Joe sit around while they cleaned up, the roommates told him to ante up or move out . This expression comes from poker and other betting games, where to ante signifies making a bet or contribution to the pot before the cards are dealt. It was being used more loosely by the mid-1800s. Also see raise the ante.
See also: ante, up

raise the ante

Increase the price or cost of something, as in We'd hoped to invest in some land, but they've raised the ante and now we can't afford it . This term alludes to the ante or stakes of gambling. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: ante, raise
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

up the ante

COMMON
1. In an argument or contest, if you up the ante, you increase the demands that you are making or the risks that you are taking. Note: In card games such as poker, the ante is the amount of money which each player must place on the table before the game begins. The secretary of state last night upped the ante by refusing to accept the election results. Whenever they reached their goal, they upped the ante, setting increasingly complex challenges for themselves. Note: You can also say that you raise the ante. These judges have raised the ante by challenging the authority of the Chief Justice.
2. If you are gambling or investing money in something and you up the ante, you increase the amount of money you are offering. Note: In card games such as poker, the ante is the amount of money which each player must place on the table before the game begins. Its network television division upped the ante by paying an estimated $2 million a year for an overall deal. Note: You can also say that you raise the ante. My defeat came when I was unable to persuade my backer to raise the ante.
See also: ante, up
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

up (or raise) the ante

increase what is at stake or under discussion, especially in a conflict or dispute.
Ante comes from Latin, in which it means ‘before’. As an English noun it was originally (in the early 19th century) a term in poker and similar gambling games, meaning ‘a stake put up by a player before drawing cards’.
1998 New Scientist This report ups the ante on the pace at which these cases need to be identified and treated.
See also: ante, up
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

raise/up the ˈante

increase the level of something, especially demands or sums of money: His ex-wife has upped the ante in her alimony suit against him.
The ante is the amount of money that players bet in a card game such as poker.
See also: ante, raise, up
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ante up

v.
1. To put some amount into the pool at the beginning of a round in poker or a similar card game: Everyone should ante up $1 to start the game. It may be your last dollar, but you'll have to ante it up! We must ante up before the cards are dealt.
2. To provide some funds or capital: The fundraisers anted up $10,000 for the charity.
3. To pay some amount of money, often reluctantly: Travelers are forced to ante up $5 for a candy bar at the airport. Can you imagine having to ante money up to use the restroom?
See also: ante, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ante

(ˈænti)
1. n. an amount of money that must be contributed before playing certain card games such as poker. (see also penny-ante.) That’s a pretty high ante. Forget it!
2. n. the charge or cost. What’s the ante for a used 1985 four-door?

penny-ante

mod. trivial; cheap. (see also ante.) I’m sick of this penny-ante stuff. Let’s get serious.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

ante up, to

To pay what is due, to contribute one’s share. This phrase comes from poker and other gambling games, where to ante means making a contribution to the pot before the cards are dealt. It was used more loosely starting in the mid-nineteenth century. On June 17, 2010, a New York Times editorial bore the headline, “BP Begins to Ante Up,” meaning British Petroleum, the company responsible for the enormous Gulf of Mexico oil spill, was beginning to offer retribution. Also see raise the ante.
See also: ante

penny-ante game, a

A low-level enterprise. This term comes from poker, where ante, Latin for “before,” signifies the chips placed on the table before betting begins. In a penny-ante game, a chip is worth only one cent, or a penny, the lowest possible stake. Like many other poker terms, by the mid-1800s this one was transferred to unrelated enterprises to signify “small-time” or “unimportant.” Thus, the Negro Digest (August 1946) stated, “Compared to the man Bilbo, 63-year-old John Ruskin is strictly penny ante and colorless,” and M. Maguire in Scratchproof (1976), “I’m not a penny-ante hood.”

raise the ante, to

Also, to up the ante. To increase the price or cost of something in order to achieve a better result. Dating from the late 1800s, the term alludes to the stakes of gambling, where the ante means the stake each player must put into the pool. It has long been used figuratively, as in “They are raising the ante in what it takes to become a certified analyst.”
See also: raise
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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Incluso el Partido de Accion Nacional (PAN) de Fox, de centroderecha, retrocedio ante la medida.
Ante todo, Montaner le sale al paso a las teorias racistas que propugnan que ciertos pueblos no estan dotados biologicamente de la capacidad para situarse en el peloton de vanguardia del desarrollo.