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scare the hell out of (one)

To shock or frighten one very suddenly and/or severely. Don't sneak up on me like that, you scared the hell out of me! That car accident seems to have scared the hell out of Janet—she's still shaken by it.
See also: hell, of, out, scare

scare, annoy, etc. the ˈhell out of somebody

(informal) scare, annoy, etc. somebody very much: The sight of a man with a gun scared the hell out of her.Louise suddenly surprised the hell out of us by announcing that she was pregnant!
See also: hell, of, out, somebody
References in periodicals archive ?
White van men made 18 per cent of motorists angry while 13 per cent were most annoyed by cyclists, six per cent by motorcyclists, four per cent by bus drivers and only one per cent by pedestrians.
White van man made 18 per cent of motorists angry while 13 per cent were most annoyed by cyclists, six per cent by motorcyclists, four per cent by bus drivers and only one per cent by pedestrians.
HOW SHE ANNOYED US: Had the ability, and was a great saleswoman, but ruined it all by shouting in the faces of anyone she came across, addressing them all LIKE.
You're annoyed with him now; you'll be even more annoyed after marriage.
My friends think I should confront her and I want to but I'm scared my boyfriend will be annoyed with me.
If you're mostly annoyed at home, try to avoid acting rude, which can cause unnecessary fights and tension.
I was annoyed at myself, annoyed at Jamilet, and slightly bewildered about my strong feelings about a small black mark that I knew was just a symbol.
The repetition annoyed me and is sure to annoy those who might use this resource.
Having annoyed the Nazis in 1933, he fled via Switzerland to the States where he died in 1936.
When the BBC man once annoyed Gordon Brown, I trod on his TV cable and he fell in a heap.
I'm annoyed and irrited by the ubiquitous phrase "address the issue" (and its many variations) for two reasons: its obvious overuse and its lack of real meaning, or specificity.
The Democrats and the media at large were annoyed, sometimes even enraged, both in the U.
the 105-year-old pest control company, Americans who find pests in their homes feel more embarrassed and annoyed than they do afraid.
The Brits were also annoyed by people driving too close behind them and people who smell, with 55 per cent and 52 per cent of the 3,000 people polled saying this was one of their biggest peeves.