anger

(redirected from angered)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

burst with (an emotion)

Of an emotion, to be so filled up with something as to be unable to contain it. I was bursting with anger after they fired me from my job. My kids burst with joy when we told them we were going to the theme park over the weekend.
See also: burst

never let the sun go down on your anger

Always make amends before the day is done; do not go to sleep angry. I know you're mad at him right now, but you should never let the sun go down on your anger.
See also: anger, down, go, let, never, on, sun

blanch with (an emotion)

To become visibly pale as a result of feeling a particular emotion. All of my friends ran into the creepy haunted house, but I blanched with fear when I saw it. Stella blanched with disgust at the plate of cooked ants that had been set before her.
See also: blanch

boil with (an emotion)

To express or feel an emotion, typically anger, very intensely. Things are often tense between my mom and my aunt, so when they had to spend days together on our family vacation, they were soon boiling with anger. When I saw that someone had backed into my new car, I immediately boiled with rage.
See also: boil

bristle with rage

To show sudden anger. I bristled with rage when I saw that someone had hit my car overnight.
See also: bristle, rage

eaten up with (something)

Obsessed or overwhelmed with something, often an emotion. I was so eaten up with anger that I couldn't stop punching the bully once I'd started.
See also: eaten, up

more in sorrow than in anger

Primarily motivated by sadness, even though appearing angry. Oh, I'm sure she said that more in sorrow than in anger—she's still reeling from her husband's death, after all.
See also: anger, more, sorrow

cage of anger

A state of intense anger or rage that inhibits one's ability to forgive others or move on with one's life. Tom has been trapped in a cage of anger ever since his wife and child were killed, lashing out at everyone and everything around him. I know what she did was horrible, but you can't stay in this cage of anger your whole life.
See also: anger, cage, of

express (one's) anger

To release or share one's anger in some way. I express a lot of my anger in therapy. He never expressed his anger to me, so I had no idea he was so unhappy.
See also: anger, express

fire (one) with (an emotion)

To cause one to feel a particular emotion. Overhearing Tim's nasty comments about me fired me with anger. I was having a rough day until thoughts of our upcoming beach vacation fired me with joy.
See also: fire

flame with (an emotion)

Of the eyes, to seem to convey a particular feeling or emotion with intensity. Callie's eyes flamed with anger when I accused her of cheating on the test. Of course John's interested in you—his eyes are practically flaming with desire every time he looks at you.
See also: flame

flash with (an emotion)

Of the eyes, to seem to convey a particular feeling or emotion with intensity. Callie's eyes flashed with anger when I accused her of cheating on the test. Of course John's interested in you—his eyes practically flash with desire every time he looks at you. Yeah, my mom knows you—her eyes flashed with recognition when I said your name.
See also: flash

bristle with rage

 and bristle with anger; bristle with indignation
Fig. to demonstrate one's anger, rage, or displeasure with a strong negative response. (Alludes to a dog or cat raising the hair on its back in anger or as a threat.) She was just bristling with anger. I don't know what set her off. Walter bristled with rage as he saw the damage to his new car.
See also: bristle, rage

express one's anger

to allow a release or expression of anger, such as through angry words, violence, or talking out a problem. Don't keep your emotions inside of you. You have to learn to express your anger. Bob expresses his anger by yelling at people.
See also: anger, express

fire someone with anger

 and fire someone with enthusiasm; fire someone with hope; fire someone with expectations
Fig. [for someone's words] to fill someone with eagerness or the desire to do something. The speech fired the audience with enthusiasm for change. We were fired with anger to protest against the government.
See also: anger, fire

flame with anger

 and flame with resentment; flame with lust; flame with vengeance
Fig. [for someone's eyes] to "blaze" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement, usually a negative feeling. His eyes flamed with resentment when he heard Sally's good news. Her eyes flamed with hatred.
See also: anger, flame

flash with anger

 and flash with recognition; flash with eagerness
[for someone's eyes] to "glimmer" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement. Her green eyes flashed with anger. Ellen's eyes flashed with recognition when she saw me.
See also: anger, flash

more in sorrow than in anger

Saddened rather than infuriated by someone's behavior. For example, When Dad learned that Jack had stolen a car, he looked at him more in sorrow than in anger . This expression first appeared in 1603 in Shakespeare's Hamlet (1:2), where Horatio describes to Hamlet the appearance of his father's ghost: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
See also: anger, more, sorrow

more in sorrow than in anger

with regret or sadness rather than with anger.
This is taken from Hamlet. When Hamlet asks Horatio to describe the expression on the face of his father's ghost, Horatio replies ‘a countenance more in sorrow than in anger’.
See also: anger, more, sorrow

do something more in ˌsorrow than in ˈanger

do something because you feel sad or sorry rather than angry: They said they were threatening legal action more in sorrow than in anger.
See also: anger, more, something, sorrow

the cage of anger

n. a prison. (Streets.) The judge put JoJo into the cage of anger for a three-year stretch.
See also: anger, cage, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Among anger experiences, the Filipino students reported a greater tendency to be angered when intentionally provoked when other students take away their possessions, being disturbed in their work, and being teased.
This theory suggests that, compared to low trait anger individuals, those high in trait anger will become angered by more situations (elicitation hypothesis), respond with more frequent and intense anger (frequency and intensity hypotheses), express anger in more aggressive (aggression hypothesis) and less adaptive, constructive ways (reduced positive coping hypotheses), and experience more frequent and severe anger-related consequences (consequence hypothesis).
But even when angered, concern about the target's feelings or concern about being observed by others reduced the likelihood of expressing that anger.
Compared to low trait anger individuals, high trait anger individuals (a) are angered by more types of events, (b) experience more frequent and intense anger, (c) express their anger through dysfunctional anger suppression and in outwardly negative, less controlled ways, (d) experience more frequent and, in some cases, more severe anger consequences, and (e) report their anger to be more of a personal problem (Deffenbacher, Oetting, Thwaites, et al.
That is, high anger participants who recognized anger problems reported a higher propensity to become more frequently and intensely angered across a wide range of situations and more difficulty in controlling or reducing their anger in positive, constructive ways than high anger individuals who did not report an awareness of anger problems.
This theory predicts that compared to low trait anger individuals, those high in trait anger will be angered by more things (elicitation hypothesis), experience more frequent and intense anger over time and situations (frequency and intensity hypotheses), engage in more aggressive behavior (aggression hypothesis), and experience more adverse anger-related outcomes (negative consequence hypothesis).