and you

and you

A phrase used to ask someone a question that they have just asked you. A: "How are you?" B: "I'm good, and you?"
See also: and

And you?

 and Yourself?
a way of redirecting a previously asked question to the asker or someone else. Bill: Do you want some more cake? Mary: Yes, thanks. Yourself ? Bill: I've had enough. Jane: Are you enjoying yourself? Bill: Oh, yes, and you?
See also: and
References in classic literature ?
And you, as have been here ever since last Michaelmas, and I hired you at Treddles'on stattits, without a bit o' character--as I say, you might be grateful to be hired in that way to a respectable place; and you knew no more o' what belongs to work when you come here than the mawkin i' the field.
"Ah, the Scantlands would go much better with Choyce's farm, especially as he wants dairyland and you've got plenty.
He say, 'I will give you position in my hotel, and you shall earn your living.' What choice?
I give you good place in my hotel, and you spend your time flinging cats.
You'll see men all round you going into the Staff Corps, and doing every possible sort of duty but regimental, and you may be tempted to follow suit.
"Damn Private Dormer and you too!" said Bobby Wick, running the blotter over the half-finished letter.
'You sneer, perhaps; and you take a lofty air upon yourself perhaps!
Tulliver, why, there'd be eight people besides the children, and I must put two more leaves i' the table, besides reaching down more o' the dinner-service; and you know as well as I do as my sisters and your sister don't suit well together."