ancient

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Related to ancientness: Ancientry

ancient history

slang Something that is very outdated or totally forgotten (often in favor of a more recent development). Oh, Jack is ancient history, we broke up weeks ago! Her interest in photography is ancient history now that she's started doing yoga.
See also: ancient, history

(as) ancient as the hills

Very old. Oh, she's ancient as the hills, she can't hear us. Why don't we ever sing new songs? Those hymns are as ancient as the hills.
See also: ancient, hill

the Ancient of Days

A name for the Christian God, as used in Daniel 7:9 in the Bible. So many people get lost in the consumer frenzy of Christmas that they forget to celebrate it as the moment when the Ancient of Days came to Earth in human form.
See also: ancient, days, of

ancient history

Fig. someone or something from so long ago as to be completely forgotten or no longer important, as a former relationship. Bob? I never think about Bob anymore. He's ancient history. His interest in joining the army is now ancient history.
See also: ancient, history

ancient history

A past event, as in She's talking about her sea voyage, but that's ancient history, or And then there was his divorce, but you don't want to hear ancient history. This hyperbolic idiom transfers the field of ancient history to a much-repeated tale.
See also: ancient, history

the ancient of Days

a biblical title for God, taken from Daniel 7:9.
See also: ancient, days, of

ancient (or old) as the hills

of very long standing or very great age.
Hills are used in the Bible as a metaphor for permanence.
See also: ancient, hill

ancient history

n. someone or something completely forgotten, especially past romances. (see also history.) That business about joining the army is ancient history.
See also: ancient, history
References in periodicals archive ?
Levi-Strauss gives such readings of single stories while presenting his megamythology, so I fault him only for overlooking his native colleagues, or rivals, the formers of multi-story oral books of ancientness.
Like every other pensioner, his phone was given to him five years ago by someone who was embarrassed at its ancientness.
And, however fascinating it may be to debate the claims to primacy of Oxford and Bologna (both eclipsed in ancientness, of course, by Al-Ahzar, Nalanda, and Taxila), looking for a point of historical origin tends likewise to obscure the sense of urgency that should attend any statement of a university's role, particularly at a time when--at least in Britain--it is under such threat.
Not only was judicial torture therefore useful, it could also be justified by the ancientness and universality of its use.
Equally, while the sense of ancientness is perhaps an aspect of every empire's claim to legitimacy, the balance between past and present shifts when decline sets in.
The ancientness of the historical period under investigation lends itself to a material focus, based on trade and regional/local consumption patterns.
For example, France's history has been neatly encapsulated by Tony Judt, who stresses "the sheer ancientness and unbroken continuity of France and the French state .
He has earned his vision of transcendent unity by becoming literally one with the land, part of what is now always meant by "Australia": "And me all that while lying quiet in the heart of the country, slowly sinking into the ancientness of it, making it mine, grain by grain blending my white grains with its many black ones" (130).
In the midst of legal precedents, he also invokes the biblical son of Noah and the mythological centaur Nessus (whose bloody tunic adhered to Hercules, setting his skin on fire and killing him) to demonstrate the ancientness and permanence of blackness (set in contrast to the purity of legislation).
Ancientness of family did play a role in a few relatively insignificant cases, but on the whole robe and sword, or old and new, as fundamental distinctions simply did not exist.
beguiling atmosphere of ancientness, quite different from the somewhat faceless modern suburbs to the west.
There's areas of the Welsh countryside that are reminiscent of New Zealand, especially in the South Island of New Zealand that look like Wales with the hills and coastline, there's an ancientness about the countryside there that is a bit more raw here.
I had arrived at some deep, palpable ancientness, the womb of the world, where virtually everything was and will be created.
To ancientness, to caprice, to that seething past of no