eagle

(redirected from an eagle)

double eagle

golf
1. noun A score of three strokes under par on a single hole. You had two strokes on that par five, right? Wow, that's a double eagle! I can't believe you got a double eagle on that difficult hole—great job!
2. verb To score three strokes under par on a single hole. I can't believe you double eagled on that difficult hole—great job! I'll finish with a better score than you if I double eagle the next hole too—just saying.
See also: double, eagle

eagle

golf
1. noun A score of two strokes under par on a single hole. You had three strokes on that par five, right? Nice, that's an eagle! I can't believe you got an eagle on such a difficult hole—great job!
2. verb To score two strokes under par on a single hole. I can't believe you eagled on such a difficult hole—great job! I'll finish with a better score than you if I eagle the next hole—just saying.

eagle eye

1. Excellent eyesight, especially for something in particular. I have an eagle eye for spotting wildlife.
2. An ability to discern small details; a keen skill of observation. We need to get Sally's eagle eye on this manuscript because she'll be sure to spot any errors.
3. An attentive gaze. You need to keep an eagle eye on the kids because they will get into everything the minute you turn your back.
4. One who is apt to discern small details or pay close attention to someone or something. Ugh, I got a demerit because some eagle eye saw me with my shirt untucked during yesterday's assembly.
See also: eagle, eye

eagle freak

A derogatory term for an ardent environmentalist. Is anyone surprised that those eagle freaks in my neighborhood have taken up composting?
See also: eagle, freak

legal eagle

An especially clever, aggressive, or skillful attorney. I might be considered something of a legal eagle now, but I had to work for years to get enough experience to build my reputation.
See also: eagle, legal

the day the eagle flies

Payday. The phrase refers to US currency bearing the image of an eagle. Primarily heard in US. Next Friday is the day the eagle flies, so let's go out to dinner then—I'm just broke right now.
See also: eagle, flies

the day the eagle shits

rude slang Payday. The phrase refers to US currency bearing the image of an eagle. Next Friday is the day the eagle shits, so let's go out to dinner then—I'm just broke right now.
See also: eagle, shit

the eagle flies

dated slang Payday has arrived. A reference to the bald eagle that is featured prominently on American currency. Used most often in the US Military. Primarily heard in US. I'll have to wait until the eagle flies to pay these bills. The troops are always eager to venture into town when the eagle flies.
See also: eagle, flies

the eagle has landed

Someone or something has arrived; something been done. The phrase was famously said by US astronaut Neil Armstrong when the Eagle Lunar Lander landed on the moon in 1969. The eagle has landed—we just touched down in Texas, so we'll be seeing you soon. I tracked my package, and it said that the eagle has landed. So where the heck is it?
See also: eagle, landed

watch (someone or something) with an eagle eye

To observe very closely, without ever looking away. Like all birds of prey, eagles are known for their excellent vision. You've already been caught once, so you better believe the principal is going to be watching you with an eagle eye from now on. I've been watching that spot with an eagle eye, but still no sign of the leopard.
See also: eagle, eye, watch
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

eagle eye

acute eyesight; an intently watchful eye. (From the sharp eyesight of the eagle.) The students wrote their essays under the eagle eye of the headmaster. The umpire kept his eagle eye on the tennis match.
See also: eagle, eye
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eagle eye

Unusually keen sight; also, keen intellectual vision. For example, Antiques dealers have an eagle eye for valuable objects, or A good manager has an eagle eye for employee errors. [Late 1500s]
See also: eagle, eye
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

an eagle eye

If someone has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things. No antiques shop, market or furniture shop escapes her eagle eye. Phil's played first-class cricket for five years in England under the eagle eye of our umpires. You must watch builders with an eagle eye because some will cheat the minute you turn your back. Note: You can also say that someone keeps an eagle eye on someone or something. Managers of Europe's top clubs are keeping an eagle eye on the World Championships, hoping to snap up new talent. Note: You can also describe someone as eagle-eyed. As the band were passing through security, an eagle-eyed official spotted an 18-inch knife in their luggage. Note: Eagles have very good eyesight, and are able to see small animals or objects from a great height.
See also: eagle, eye
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

an/somebody’s ˌeagle ˈeye

(informal) if somebody has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things: Nothing the staff did escaped the eagle eye of the manager (= he saw everything they did). ▶ ˌeagle-ˈeyed adj.: An eagle-eyed student spotted the mistake.
See also: eagle, eye
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

day the eagle shits

n. payday. (Military. Usually objectionable.) Tomorrow is the day the eagle shits, and do I ever need it.
See also: eagle, shit

eagle

n. a dollar bill. (From the picture of the eagle on the back.) This thing ain’t worth four eagles!

eagle freak

n. someone with strong concerns about the environment and conservation, especially the preservation of the eagle. (A play on eco freak.) The eagle freaks oppose building the dam.
See also: eagle, freak

eagle-eye

1. n. a busybody; a person who watches or monitors other people’s actions: a floorwalker, a detective, a hall-monitor. Some old eagle-eye across the street saw me standing in the cold and called my wife who came down and let me in.
2. n. an eye or eyes with very keen vision. Keep your eagle-eye trained on the entrance.

legal-beagle

and legal-eagle (ˈliglæˈbiglæ and ˈliglæˈiglæ)
n. a lawyer. I’ve got a legal-beagle who can get me out of this scrape.

legal-eagle

verb

when the eagle flies

and day the eagle flies
in. payday. (The eagle is the one found on U.S. currency.) I’ll pay you back when the eagle flies. I’ll find you the day the eagle flies.
See also: eagle, flies

day the eagle flies

verb
See also: eagle, flies
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

eagle-eyed

Keen-sighted, either literally or figuratively. Like all birds of prey, eagles of necessity have excellent eyesight, which they need to spot their food supply. Their perspicacity has been transferred to human beings since Roman times. Horace pointed out (Satires, 35 b.c.) that those who are eagle-eyed in spotting others’ faults are blind to their own. “Faith, being eagle-eyed, can . . . see the majestie of God,” wrote Bishop William Barlow in 1601. Later the term was often put as having an eagle eye.
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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