avenue of escape

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avenue of escape

A way or path out of something. That beetle doesn't seem to know that his only avenue of escape is the open window. The fire was in the kitchen, so our only avenue of escape was through the front door.
See also: avenue, escape, of

avenue of escape

Fig. the pathway or route along which someone or something escapes. The open window was the bird's only avenue of escape from the house. Bill saw that his one avenue of escape was through the back door.
See also: avenue, escape, of
References in classic literature ?
Here I left my guides, and, slipping to the nearest window, sought for an avenue of escape. The windows opened upon a great balcony which overlooked one of the broad avenues of Zodanga.
With the light he found it easier to regain control of his nerves, and presently he was again making his way along the tunnel in search of an avenue of escape. The horrid cry that had come down to him from above through the ancient well-shaft still haunted him, so that he trembled in terror at even the sounds of his own cautious advance.
I did not pause longer than to learn the contents of the second message, and, though I was none too sure of the meaning of the final admonition, "Beyond the knots lies danger," yet I was sure that here before me lay an avenue of escape, and that the sooner I took advantage of it the more likely was I to win to liberty.
Yet the wall was not fully six feet from him, and the top of it at least five feet above the top of the shed--those who had designed the campong had been careful to set this structure sufficiently far from the palisade to prevent its forming too easy an avenue of escape.
Tarzan scanned the precipitous walls for an avenue of escape. They would have baffled an ordinary man; but the ape-man, accustomed to climbing, saw several places where he might gain a foothold, precarious possibly; but enough to give him reasonable assurance of escape if Numa would but betake himself to the far end of the gulch for a moment.
A mature buck will not feed in the open unless he feels secure and has an avenue of escape. The best place to find these afternoon feeders is where they have a brushy draw they can dive into at the hint of danger or possibly a creek-bottom thicket along the edge of the field.
He added, however, that "a broader view of Oregon law provides an avenue of escape."
Improved screening for indications of trafficking and additional alternatives to deportation are necessary to identify these victims and provide an avenue of escape for those who wish to pursue it.
Still, Cornwallis had an avenue of escape. If he could get his army across the York River, he could easily defeat the small force blocking him there and proceed north to link with Clinton in New York.
"Many of the tropical scenes were created as an avenue of escape from everyday life." The artist often uses photos from her travels as a reference, "but I take many liberties with shape, composition, and, in particular, color.
The frantic efforts of the SS to provide itself with an avenue of escape provide an object lesson in the smaller moral bankruptcies that accompanied the more conspicuous evils of the Nazi regime, but they form an entirely different lesson from that taught by the death factories and macabre medical experiments of Nazi scientists.
As the noose tightened around the necks of European Jewry, one is impressed by Heschel's continued devotion to Jewish scholarship and his earnest attempt to foster Jewish renewal in Germany, all the while seeking an avenue of escape. As the authors point out, Heschel's survival was effected by a chain of fortuitous circumstances: he was deported to Poland just one week before the nightmare of Kristallnacht; he managed to flee to England just six weeks before the German invasion of Poland; and even the ship that brought him to America, to accept a position at the Hebrew Union College, was sunk just a few weeks later by the German navy.
It was also a time of great popular interest in visualizing a fourth spatial dimension--a concept that appeared to offer painters and sculptors, in particular, an avenue of escape from conventional representation.
In a brief conclusion Tiller notes that while the modern autobiography was developing, there was scarcely any free representation of the female self, although the very act of writing gave some substance to the feminine subject, and the religious concern deemed proper for women offered a kind of liberation in mystical themes (which traditionally gave both men and women an avenue of escape under cover of obedience).