artificial language

(redirected from an artificial language)

artificial language

A language devised for a specific purpose, such as computer programming. We need to develop an artificial language for this coding project.
See also: language
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, July 22 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that the harder adults try to learn an artificial language, the worse they are at deciphering the language's morphology, the structure and deployment of linguistic units such as root words, suffixes, and prefixes.
In addition to several errors, Smith discovers a great deal of inconsistency, and argues that "[i]t is truly a pity that the first translation of The Lord of the Rings into an artificial language was not done with the care and attention to detail that such a project requires and deserves" (116).
Like the denizens of Orwell's dystopia, they would be cut off from the old world by an artificial language barrier:
In their research, Nadel and his colleagues played recordings of "phrases" created from an artificial language to four dozen 15-month-old infants during a learning session.
Along with More, Wilkins, and George Dalgarno, he attempted to create an artificial language, published first in A Common Writing in 1646 and then again with his innovative universal phonetic alphabet in the Philosophical Transactions in 1686.
At any moment in the evolution of an artificial language, the researcher can play the role of an "artificial language typologist" and describe the evolved grammar.
Although most people knew that Esperanto was an artificial language developed to allow the different nationalities to communicate without feeling they were being in anyway unpatriotic by learning the language of a rival country, very few people had ever actually heard it, let alone seen it written down.
An artificial language would help to correct this problem by proving an "exact map of the order of things, and of thought" (2).
Among specific topics are accounting for social factors in phonetic variability, learning the mapping from surface to underlying representations in an artificial language, a syllable-level intergestual timing model, and tongue body constriction differences in click types.
Furthermore, an artificial language could also be learned if it connected signs and their grammatical form changes with the simplest syllables available, and if it, at the same time, could be communicated orally.
Though it is an artificial language, Klingon has vocabulary, grammar and syntax, dictionaries, and a scholarly journal.
A new study suggests that adults can exploit patterns in an artificial language to discern novel nonsense words in a stream of syllables, but use a different mental computation to discover rules governing the construction of those words.
In the second half of the century, Bacon's suggestion materialized in the project sponsored by the Royal Society to devise an artificial language.
The first is that of Leibniz in his preliminary writings for the project of an artificial language that never saw the light of day, the Characteristica universalis; the second is that of Kleist in his famous short text Uber die allmahliche Verfertigung des Gedanken beim Reden, 1805 (On the Progressive Elaboration of Thought in Language).
By doing this we would have started to create an artificial language to describe the contents of the animal's mental states.