apple

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apple

1. obsolete slang A baseball. The first baseman snatched the apple out of the air and tagged his base, then threw it to the second baseman for a double play.
2. slang In hockey, a pass that enables one's teammate to score a goal; an assist. The Red Wings' forward plucked a timely apple in the final seconds of the game to seal a 4–3 victory over the Oilers.
3. offensive slang An ethnic slur for a Native American who adopts the speech, clothing, behavior, beliefs, or values typical of Caucasian Americans. The term refers to the idea that such a person is "red" (a common slur for the appearance of Native Americans) on the outside but "white" (Caucasian) on the inside. The senatorial candidate has been an outspoken advocate for the rights of Native Americans, but some within the community have labeled him an apple for being too entrenched in white politics and business.

apples

1. slang Stairs. From Cockney rhyming slang, in which "apples" is a shortening of "apples and pears," which rhymes with "stairs." Primarily heard in UK. My legs were so tired that I could barely climb the apples up to bed!
2. slang Good; fine. From rhyming slang, in which "apples" is a shortening of "apples and spice," which rhymes with "nice." Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Oh yeah, she's apples here—nothing to worry about!
3. vulgar slang Testicles. She kicked the man right in the apples when he tried to grope her in the bar.
4. vulgar slang Breasts. Her tight-fitting top outlined her lovely apples in a most seductive manner.
See also: apple
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

apple

1. n. a baseball. Jim slammed the apple over the plate, but the ump called it a ball.
2. n. an American Indian who behaves more like a European than an Indian. (see also banana. Rude and derogatory.) Stop acting like an apple all the time!
3. n. a breast. (Usually plural. Usually objectionable.) Look at the firm little apples on that girl!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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