amok


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Related to amok: Run amok

go amok

1. To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be or become crazy or chaotic. We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but they all started going amok as soon as they got here. The villagers were cleaning up debris for days after the bulls went amok through the streets.
2. To become bad or go awry; to get out of control; to go haywire. This whole operation has gone amok. I don't know how we can be expected to finish by the deadline under these conditions.
3. dated To rush around in a violent, murderous frenzy. (Note: This is the phrase's original specific meaning, taken from Malay. "Amok" also has an older alternative spelling, "amuck.") Fueled by alcohol and cocaine, Dave went amok when his wife told him she'd been seeing someone else. Luckily, a neighbor called the police when they heard such a commotion.
See also: amok, go

run amok

1. To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be crazy or chaotic. We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but as soon as they all got here they started running amok. The villagers were cleaning up debris for days after the bulls ran amok through the streets.
2. To become bad or go awry; to get out of control; to go haywire. This whole operation has run amok. I don't know how we can be expected to finish under the deadline in these conditions.
3. dated To rush around in a violent, murderous frenzy. This is the phrase's original meaning, taken from Malay. "Amok" also has an older alternative spelling, "amuck." Members of the warrior clan were known to run amok on the battlefield in a bloodthirsty frenzy.
See also: amok, run

run amok

 and run amuck
to go awry; to go bad; to turn bad; to go into a frenzy. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok. He ran amuck early in the school year and never quite got back on the track.
See also: amok, run

run amok

Also, run riot or wild . Behave in a frenzied, out-of-control, or unrestrained manner. For example, I was afraid that if I left the toddler alone she would run amok and have a hard time calming down , or The weeds are running riot in the lawn, or The children were running wild in the playground. Amok comes from a Malay word for "frenzied" and was adopted into English, and at first spelled amuck, in the second half of the 1600s. Run riot dates from the early 1500s and derives from an earlier sense, that is, a hound's following an animal scent. Run wild alludes to an animal reverting to its natural, uncultivated state; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: amok, run

run amok

behave uncontrollably and disruptively.
Amok , formerly also spelt amuck , comes from the Malay word amuk , meaning ‘in a homicidal frenzy’, in which sense it was first introduced into English in the early 16th century.
1990 New York Review of Books Hersh's article is sensationalism run amok. It does no credit to him or to The New York Times Magazine .
See also: amok, run

run aˈmok

behave in a wild or uncontrolled way: The crowd ran amok through the city streets when they heard their leaders had been killed. Amok comes from the Malay word for ‘attack fiercely’.
See also: amok, run

run amok

(ˈrən əˈmək)
in. to go awry. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok.
See also: amok, run

run amok, to

To go crazy; to behave in a wild, frenzied manner. This term is based on the Malay word amok, meaning “a state of frenzy.” In England, however, it was at first spelled amuck, as in Andrew Marvell’s account (The Rehearsal Transposed, 1672): “Like a raging Indian . . . he runs a mucke (as they cal it there) stabbing every man he meets.”
See also: run
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, the passage between amok and amuck came down to English; outwardly it appeared seamless and sociable.
'This is not a mere warning, don't play if you don't want the amok to happen.'
His cocktails also have an element of fusion, like the refreshing vodka-based POU Mok ($2.75), which is flavoured with an amok syrup or, after dinner, a jungle berry-infused rice wine digestif ($2).
Verdict prompted thugs to run amok through the Old Bailey and threaten jurors Duggan the beengreen Are mourn
For now, fans can make the most of the situation by streaming "Amok" by Atoms for Peace below.
Amok seems to be improving with each outing over hurdles and won convincingly at Fakenham last time.
Kitchener, ON -- In what is being described as the result of "sex change lunacy" and judicial activism run amok, a 43-year-old trans-sexual murderer has trashed the medium/minimum security women's prison in which he was being held.
What about the rights of the people of Edinburgh, Gleneagles and Auchterarder who had to endure hoards of people running amok and causing damage to property?
For example, Burdick describes how the brown tree snake, a native of Australia, now runs amok in Guam.
A charity worker has said youngsters 'are running amok' in a South Wales town.
Another problem blighting Liverpool is ``professional'' dog walkers who arrive at the park with up to 12 dogs at a time, let them off the lead, and allow them to run amok.
Like Zeno's paradox gone amok or the child's rhyming riddle "Pete and Repeat" caught in nauseating repetition, his sculptures can become unnerving.
An inquiry was held after two chimpanzees escaped and ran amok in the town on Christmas Eve 1995.
Two people were injured and a third left in shock yesterday after an axeman 'ran amok' before launching a frenzied attack inside a historic abbey.
TWO people were injured and a third left in shock yesterday after an axeman ``ran amok'' before launching a frenzied attack inside an historic abbey.