along for the ride, to go/to come/just

along for the ride

Attending some event or participating in some activity without playing an active or central role in the proceedings. John's receiving an award for his work overseas tonight, and I'm just along for the ride. I'm going along for the ride to my friends' book club meeting later to see if I want to become a member.
See also: ride

come along for the ride

To accompany one to an event or activity without being significantly involved in it. Oh, I'm just coming along for the ride with the rest of the department—I'm not presenting at the conference or anything.
See also: come, ride

go along for the ride

To attend some event or participate in some activity without playing an active or central role in the proceedings. John's receiving an award for his work overseas tonight, so I thought I'd go along for the ride. I'm going along for the ride to my friends' book club meeting later to see if I want to become a member.
See also: go, ride

along for the ride

Participating but not actively, as in Don't ask me how long this job will take; I'm just along for the ride. This metaphoric term often is preceded by just to emphasize the passive role of the "passenger." [Mid-1900s]
See also: ride

go along for the ride

or

come along for the ride

If someone goes along for the ride or comes along for the ride, they join in an activity but do not do it seriously or get very involved. John was on a job taking pictures of a band and I had agreed to go along for the ride. `Who's that with you?' — `A friend of mine. He came along for the ride.'
See also: go, ride

along for the ride, to go/to come/just

To take part but passively. The phrase, originating in the United States in the mid-twentieth century, implies some of the acquiescence of go along with but makes it clear that one is not in the driver’s seat.
See also: come, go, just