alloy (something) with

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alloy (something) with

1. Literally, to melt different metals together. Can I alloy this metal with copper?
2. By extension, to combine two things (typically two aspects or traits of someone or something). Ellen has been so successful because she alloyed her dedication with her natural talent.
See also: alloy

alloy something with something

 
1. Lit. to combine one molten metal into another molten metal. Is it possible to alloy copper with nickel? The copper has been alloyed \ with nickel.
2. Fig. to combine one quality or attribute with another. She alloyed her courage with a helping of wisdom. Her courage has been alloyed with wisdom.
See also: alloy
References in periodicals archive ?
[17] have introduced four criteria that have to be satisfied in the selection process of alloying elements in order to obtain castable, precipitation-strengthened aluminum alloys with both high stability and strength at elevated temperatures.
According to the maximum solid solubility of Hf in Cu in Figure 1, we designed three sets of Cu-Hf alloys with different Hf contents, and the composition of the alloys were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP), as shown in Table 1.
Based upon the Al-Si binary system shown in Figure 1, alloys with hypoeutectic composition have a silicon composition below 12.7 wt%.
These increases in the charge transfer resistance show the increase in the corrosion resistance of the alloys with Cu addition.
For designing aviation engines of new generation with working temperatures at first stage of the engine more than 600 [degrees]C it is necessary to solve problems of development of titanium alloys with increased high-temperature strength.
Italian company produces Laripur TPUs in polyester, polyether, and polycaprolactone types, as well as TPU alloys with other thermoplastics.
A few years ago, scientists discovered that it's possible to initiate a large, controlled shape change in certain metal alloys with a magnet rather than heat.
During a project on the development of sensors for the powder metallurgy industry, NIST has developed a technique for production of nitrogenated stainless steel alloys with enhanced corrosion and mechanical properties.
In 1999, the United States produced about 30 metric tons of beryllium, mostly as alloys with copper.
Engineers found other alloys with greater corrosion resistance but they lacked the required structural strength and fracture toughness.
As compared with conventional alloys, high-entropy alloys with an appropriate design exhibit superior performances.
The Cu-based alloys with low-chromium and low-silver are attractive candidates for contact wire materials due to the excellent performance of mechanical strength and electrical conductivity [3].
Bismuth-containing alloys may perform better than leaded alloys with respect to hot tearing, which could be used to improve the design of existing components.
Those, in turn, could lead toward ways to improve metal processing--increasing its efficiency, reducing its cost, or perhaps creating new alloys with interesting properties.
The result is said to be alloys with good balances of impact strength and flexural modulus, as well as improved heat and chemical resistance.