alloy (something) with

(redirected from alloyed with)

alloy (something) with

1. Literally, to melt different metals together. Can I alloy this metal with copper?
2. By extension, to combine two things (typically two aspects or traits of someone or something). Ellen has been so successful because she alloyed her dedication with her natural talent.
See also: alloy

alloy something with something

 
1. Lit. to combine one molten metal into another molten metal. Is it possible to alloy copper with nickel? The copper has been alloyed \ with nickel.
2. Fig. to combine one quality or attribute with another. She alloyed her courage with a helping of wisdom. Her courage has been alloyed with wisdom.
See also: alloy
References in classic literature ?
But to the knowledge of human fecundity and sterility all the wisdom and education of your rulers will not attain; the laws which regulate them will not be discovered by an intelligence which is alloyed with sense, but will escape them, and they will bring children into the world when they ought not.
This study used two alloys--one with a high purity (99.99% Al) and one produced from 99.99% Al alloyed with 1% Magnesium (Mg).
GE says these modifiers can be alloyed with chlorinated PE (CPE) to create new types of TPEs without need of a compatibilizer.
Most commonly, Mg is alloyed with ferrosilicon or nickel to reduce the violence and improve recovery.
A research official at Advanced Elastomer Systems, the newly formed joint venture between Monsanto and Exxon Chemical, says a developmental elastomer, known as TPE 4000, is likely to use polyester as a continuous-phase matrix material, alloyed with a dispersed phase of acrylate rubber (see PT, April '91, p.
A new family of TP urethane (TPU) alloyed with ABS through a proprietary compatibilization chemistry, will be launched later this year by Dow Chemical for auto bumper fascias.
The mechanical properties of an ADI alloyed with 0.9% Ni and 0.6% Cu demonstrated that a processing window can be established.
He also suggested that "high-chromium irons primarily alloyed with some 2.5% Ni show economic advantages and castings which will give an abrasion resistance equal to or better than more established alloys can also be made."