ally

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ally (oneself) to

To join or unite with another person or group. In order to survive the attack, I allied myself to the invading soldiers. We need to ally ourselves to management if we want to keep our jobs.
See also: ally

pass in your ally

obsolete To perish or die. Primarily heard in Australia. You should make amends with your son before you pass in your ally.
See also: ally, pass

olly olly oxen free

A phrase used to indicate that it is OK to come home or to a home base. It is commonly used in children's games. All the kids ran back to the starting point when Brian yelled, "Olly olly oxen free!"
See also: free, olly, oxen

ally oneself to someone or something

to unite or affiliate oneself with someone or something. She sought to ally herself to the older members. Jane allied herself to the teacher almost immediately.
See also: ally

ally (oneself) (with someone) (against someone or something)

to unite with someone in opposition to someone or something. Sally allied herself with John against the committee. We allied with the older ones against the younger ones. They allied themselves against the attackers.

pass in your ally

die. Australian informal
In this phrase, an ally is a toy marble made of marble, alabaster, or glass.
See also: ally, pass
References in periodicals archive ?
and its NATO allies, respectively, will see fit to move toward a more advanced defense technology relationship in their export and procurement policies.
steps to advance NATO interoperability will be reciprocated by the allies fulfillment of their Prague Capabilities Commitment, and substantial improvements in the readiness, deployability and sustainment of European forces that would be assigned to the NATO Response Force.
But in 2003, it is fair to ask how many of the NATO allies control the export of defense technology by intangible means, that is, by email, fax, or interact.
We need to do it as a means of keeping European and American defense industries, along with those of other principal security allies beyond Europe, working for common purposes.
defense technology to our allies, and that allied governments, in turn, are open to procuring U.
How best to work with our friends and allies to ensure U.
The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks demonstrated that the threats to allies and to our alliance can come from anywhere, at any time, employing devices ranging from a box cutter to weapons of mass destruction.
currently possesses forces with such capabilities, in large measure our European allies do not.
Increased defense spending remains an important goal, and we believe allies can also use resources more effectively by greater pooling of their efforts.
In his first meeting with allies last June, the President secured a consensus to take concrete, historic decisions at Prague to advance enlargement.
We have been working with allies and the nine current aspirant countries to strengthen their preparations.