cracked up to be

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cracked up to be

Reputed or said to be. Typically used in the phase "isn't all it's cracked up to be." I'm so impressed with my new car—a luxury car really is all it's cracked up to be! Honestly, the movie isn't what it's cracked up to be. Maybe I'm just not the right audience for it.
See also: cracked, up

cracked up to be something

 and cracked up to be; cracked up as something
alleged or understood to be something. She was cracked up to be a pretty good player. She was cracked up as a pretty good golfer. (Used with the negative.) He is not the problem solving CEO that he was cracked up to be.
See also: cracked, up

cracked up to be

asserted to be (used to indicate that someone or something has been described too favourably). informal
This expression stems from the use of crack as an adjective to mean ‘pre-eminent’, a sense dating from the late 18th century.
1986 Willy Russell Shirley Valentine Our Brian suddenly realised that the part of Joseph wasn't as big as it had been cracked up to be.
See also: cracked, up

cracked up to be

mod. supposed to be. This pizza isn’t what it’s cracked up to be.
See also: cracked, up
References in periodicals archive ?
FA445 : In connection with alleged Calderdale shop theft
Security Bank, without admitting to any allegations, consented to the issuance of the order in connection with its alleged violations of the Board's regulations implementing the National Flood Insurance Act.
However, these alleged policy or procedural violations may be relevant in establishing liability for negligence under state law.
Farragut alleged that the firm had known the proposed merger would not qualify for pooling-of-assets treatment but nonetheless provided an opinion to the contrary.
If a prosecutor or law enforcement official engages in investigative or managerial activity in one of these unclear areas, and a civil suit alleging a constitutional violation results, the court will dismiss the case, because the right alleged to have been violated was not clearly established.
The appeals court held that the inmate's allegation that the correctional facility's medical director prevented him from being seen by doctors because of the inmate's prior lawsuit against the director, alleged more than a disagreement over the proper course of treatment, and the case should not have been dismissed.
The appeals court held that the prisoner sufficiently alleged a "physical injury" for the purposes of PLRA, with allegations that excessive heat in his cell made him dizzy, dehydrated, and disoriented, gave him a severe rash, and that smoke from rolled toilet paper "wicks" and frequent use of mace gave him bronchial irritation and a runny nose.