all other things (else) being equal

all other things (else) being equal

Given the same circumstances. This term began as the Latin phrase ceteris paribus; sometimes the word all is omitted, and else is substituted for other things. Eric Partridge held that the Latin form was already a cliché in the eighteenth century, and the English form became one in the late nineteenth century. Thomas Babington Macaulay was among the many learned writers who used it (although slightly differently) in his History of England (1849–61): “All other circumstances being supposed equal . . .”
See also: all, being, equal, other, thing