all's well that ends well


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all's well that ends well

A positive ending can overshadow any problems that may have preceded it. Although this phrase is the title of a Shakespeare play, it likely predates it. Hey, we're not fighting anymore, and that's all that matters. All's well that ends well. All's well that ends well—at least it didn't rain for my entire wedding day.
See also: end, that, well

All's well that ends well.

Prov. Cliché An event that has a good ending is good even if some things went wrong along the way. (This is the name of a play by Shakespeare.) I'm glad you finally got here, even though your car had a flat tire on the way. Oh, well. All's well that ends well. The groom was late for the wedding, but everything worked out all right. All's well that ends well.
See also: end, that, well

all's well that ends well

Everything has turned out satisfactorily, even though the outcome has been uncertain. For example, His lawyer persuaded Jack to plead guilty, but the court merely put him on probation-all's well that ends well . This proverb, dating from about 1250, gained even more currency as the title of a Shakespeare comedy.
See also: end, that, well

all’s well that ˈends well

(saying) if the final result is good, earlier difficulties and problems are not importantThis is the title of a play by Shakespeare.
See also: end, that, well
References in periodicals archive ?
Henry V, Julius Caesar and Hamlet date from Shakespeare's time with The Lord Chamberlain's Men, while All's Well That Ends Well and Antony & Cleopatra belong to the stretch after 1603 when the playwright belonged to The King's Men.
The world knows Dame Judi's triumphs on the big screen but may be less familiar with her stunning Lady Macbeth alongside Sir Ian McKellen in the title role, her perfectly-judged Countess in All's Well That Ends Well.
But all's well that ends well as, at that very moment, the lock released and Marion was free to race to the stage.
My missus is now on a beach in Cyprus, so all's well that ends well." Chuter's desire to wear the Red Rose little more than a year out from the World Cup speaks volumes for the newfound optimism in England ranks.
Beehler, "'Confederate Season': Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Understanding of Kairos"; Lloyd Davis, "'Sick Desires': All's Well That Ends Well and the Civilizing Process"; Ann Blake, "Breaking Rank in Shakespearean Marriage Plots"; Michael Mullin, "Shakespeare on the Web"; Susan Gushee O'Malley, "Cultural Appropriations of Shakespeare in the Classroom"; Laura Raidonis Bates, "The Uses of Shakespeare in Criminal Rehabilitation: Testing the Limits of 'Universality'"; Sara Jayne Steen, "Whose Will, or Who's Will?