alkie


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alky

1. Alcohol. It's been a rough week—let's go to the bar for some alky.
2. One who is often drunk; an alcoholic. That guy's a real alky—I wish he would get some help.

alchy

and alkie and alky (ˈælki)
1. n. alcohol; an alcoholic beverage. The crooks stole most of the alchy from the bar at the club. My great-grandfather made his own “alky” during prohibition.
2. n. a drunkard. You see alchy after alchy all up and down Maxwell Street.

alkie

verb
See alchy

alky

verb
See alchy
References in periodicals archive ?
Colorful cast--including cops, thugs, an alkie gumshoe, a creative black marketeer, politicians, protestors and prosties--renders pic fun, if expediently silly, en route to a (literally) bang-up finale.
Arsonist and alkie Phil Mitchell proved he's also an accomplished analyst by describing demented Joe Wicks as "the Bolton Fruitcake" in EastEnders.
Leanne sealing his lips with a kiss may stop alkie Barlow The Bigamist (below) being able to have a drink, but he won't just fall off the wagon, but do a backflip and triple somersault into the gutter when given a present of a bottle of Scotch.
Meanwhile, alkie Carol - Weatherfield's answer to Charles Kennedy - got her marching orders from fed-up son Jamie over her outrageous suggestion that he fancies Frankie - which he does.
"She smells, she had black teeth, she's a typical either druggie or alkie because she's dead skinny."
I am not an alkie because alkies get pissed and lie about in gutters.
He argued with his mum, abattle-axe in baffies, and his dad, an alkie who lived in a shed.
"I wasn't a pure alkie but I was getting there," he recalls.
Abandoned by her husband, a mother of four turns to the bottle and sparks up an unlikely friendship with a fellow alkie (Costner).
Secondly, Leanne's going out with Danny's son Jamie, who's having a hard time due to the fact that he's just tracked down his real mum, a super-needy alkie who calls him every 17 seconds.
But that was my way of thinking I wasn't an alkie because I had waited until a certain part of the day when the pubs were open.
Tracy Toher expressed her concern about the problems in the city centre, posting: "Was in the town yesterday and it was full of junkies and alkies. I wouldn't go near the place if I could get away with it but I can't let my mum go on her own because she might get robbed."
Leo, under the impression that he used to be an alcoholic, attends an AA meeting and admits quite honestly that "I don't really remember my drinking days" (cue nods of recognition from the former alkies).