airs and graces

airs and graces

A pretentious manner. She's always putting on airs and graces because she wants to impress other people. There's no need to put on airs and graces with me. I knew you long before you ever became successful.
See also: air, and, grace

airs and graces

BRITISH
If someone has airs and graces, they behave in a way which shows that they think they are better or more important than other people. I have never liked him — and his daughter is so full of airs and graces. Ian is such a nice bloke. He has no airs and graces. Note: You can also say that someone puts on airs and graces. In Liverpool I can still be myself, I don't have to put on any airs and graces here.
See also: air, and, grace

airs and graces

an affected manner of behaving, designed to attract or impress. British
See also: air, and, grace

ˌairs and ˈgraces

(British English, disapproving) behaviour which is elegant but unnatural and intended to impress others: Her airs and graces didn’t impress her fellow students at all.
See also: air, and, grace