air (one's) opinion

(redirected from air his opinion)

air (one's) opinion

To make one's argument, beliefs, or ideas on a given topic known, as in a discussion or debate. If you'll just allow me to air my opinion, you might understand where I stand on the matter.
See also: air, opinion
References in periodicals archive ?
The President said Binay was free to air his opinion against the administration.
A DAY after founder- member of Aam Aadmi Party ( AAP) Shanti Bhushan praised Kiran Bedi and termed her induction into the Bharatiya Janata Party ( BJP) a masterstroke, the party said Bhushan was free to air his opinion.
One should try and understand why Salman chose to air his opinion publicly.
The party had distanced itself from his views when senior BJP leader Sushma Swaraj described Kulkarni as an "independent journalist" who was free to air his opinion.
However, Culloty was one of several riders swift to air his opinion on the fence, arguing that "it's always been a problem and the problem needs addressing now".
On the Larry King show, Marlon Brando took full advantage of his constitutional right to publicly air his opinion that ``Hollywood is run by Jews, and (they) should have a greater sensitivity about the issue of people who are suffering.
But Julie said Simon had always had strong views and has never been afraid to air his opinion.
He is a well-respected dancer and as such he is surely entitled to air his opinions on the programme?
Fellow dancer] James is not afraid to air his opinions and will make a great guest on the spin-off show while Ola is in camp.
But now he is ready to air his opinions once more after signing a deal with internet station Fubar Radio to host a weekly Saturday show.
MY original letter, on the fact that AW of Gosforth seems to get more than his fair share of opportunities to air his opinions, had a relevant sentence cut out by the editor.
He'll always air his opinions, even if they are controversial, but then we are both very forthright in our views.
Newbon is given considerable space in the Mail to air his opinions and that is not set to change.
When Gordon Brown called on the pension funds to invest in private equity and commissioned Paul Myners to pen a report about it (Mr Myners opted to air his opinions about all sorts of other things instead) nobody imagined that anything would come of it.
They are the author's vehicles to air his opinions, whimsies, critical comments, and humor, as he has done so many times before with endless, sometimes unruly and sur-realistic invention.