aim

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Related to aims: AIIMS, AIMS test

aim at

1. To point or guide an object, such as a weapon, at a target. Make sure you aim at the target before you pull the trigger. His water balloon is aimed at you! Run!
2. To target a particular issue or goal. The new program is aimed at helping struggling students get the tutoring they need to succeed in class.
3. To direct something at a specific person or group. I could tell that his rude remarks were aimed at me even though he did not mention my name. The studio's ad campaign is aiming at teenagers, but I think the movie is too violent for a young audience.
See also: aim

aim for

1. To point or guide an object, such as a weapon, at a target. Make sure you aim for the target before you pull the trigger. His water balloon is aimed for you! Run!
2. To strive to accomplish a particular goal. After studying all weekend, Amanda is aiming for a perfect score on her history exam.
See also: aim

aim for the stars

Don't limit yourself—aspire to achieve greatness, even if it seems impossible or impractical. When choosing a career path, don't settle—aim for the stars!
See also: aim, star

aim to

To strive or plan to do something. I aim to be the best customer service representative I can be. I'm aiming to win Holly's heart—she is just the prettiest girl in the whole town.
See also: aim

reach for the sky

1. To set one's goals or ambitions very high; to try to attain or achieve something particularly difficult. My parents always taught me to reach for the sky when I was growing up—that I could be anything I set my mind to! With all that money, you could do whatever you want. Reach for the sky, kiddo!
2. A command for one to put one's hands up in a show of surrender, as during a robbery or an arrest. Reach for the sky, MacAfee, we've got you surrounded!
See also: reach, sky

take aim (at someone or something

1. To aim one's projectile weapon at someone or something. The sniper took aim and fired off a single shot, killing the suspect instantly. He had just begun to take aim at the deer when the sound of a car horn scared it away.
2. To direct severe criticism or scorn at someone or something. The president took aim at the Russian president during her speech. You really need to double-check your sources before you take aim like that in the future.
See also: aim, someone, something, take

aim for the sky

To set one's goals or ambitions very high; to try to attain or achieve something particularly difficult. My parents always taught me to aim for the sky when I was growing up—that I could be anything I set my mind to! With all that money, you could do whatever you want. Aim for the sky, kiddo!
See also: aim, sky

aim to (do something)

To intend, plan, or mean to do something. I didn't aim to offend him, but judging by the look on his face, I must have.
See also: aim

aim for something

 and aim at something
to strive toward a particular goal; to direct oneself or one's energies toward something. You should aim for success. Aim at getting this done on time.
See also: aim

Aim for the stars!

 and Reach for the stars!
Aspire to something!; Set one's goals high! Aim for the stars, son! Don't settle for second best. Set your sights high. Reach for the stars!
See also: aim

aim something at someone or something

to point or direct something at someone or something. Wally aimed the hose at Sarah and tried to soak her.
See also: aim

aim to do something

Rur. to intend to do something. I didn't aim to hurt your feelings, sugar, you know I didn't.
See also: aim

reach for the sky

 
1. and aim for the sky; shoot for the sky Fig. to set one's sights high. Reach for the sky! Go for it! You should always reach for the sky, but be prepared for not attaining your goals every time.
2. Fig. Inf. to put one's hands up, as in a burglary. The gunman told the bank teller to reach for the sky. Reach for the sky and give me all your money!
See also: reach, sky

take aim at someone or something

Fig. to prepare to deal with someone or something; to focus on someone or something. (Based on take aim (at someone, something, or an animal).) Now we have to take aim at the problem and try to get it solved. The critics took aim at the star of the musical and tore her to pieces.
See also: aim, take

take aim (at someone, something, or an animal)

to aim [something] at someone, something, or an animal. The hunter took aim at the deer and pulled the trigger. You must take aim carefully before you shoot.
See also: aim, take

We aim to please.

Fig. We try hard to please you. (Usually a commercial slogan, but can be said in jest by one person, often in response to Thank you.) Mary: This meal is absolutely delicious! Waiter: We aim to please. Tom: Well, Sue, here's the laundry detergent you wanted from the store. Sue: Oh, thanks loads. You saved me a trip. Tom: We aim to please.
See also: aim, please, we

aim to

Try or intend to do something, as in We aim to please, or She aims to fly to California. This term derives from aim in the sense of "direct the course of something," such as an arrow or bullet. [Colloquial; c. 1600]
See also: aim

reach for the sky

1. Set very high goals, aspire to the best, as in I'm sure they'll make you a partner, so reach for the sky. The sky here stands for high aspirations. Also see sky's the limit.
2. Put your hands up high, as in One robber held the teller at gunpoint, shouting " Reach for the sky!" This usage is always put as an imperative. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: reach, sky

take aim

Direct a missile or criticism at something or someone, as in Raising his rifle, Chet took aim at the squirrel but missed it entirely, or In his last speech the President took aim at the opposition leader. [Late 1500s]
See also: aim, take

reach for the sky

If you reach for the sky, you are ambitious and try hard to achieve something very difficult. You have inspired our students and helped them to reach for the sky.
See also: reach, sky

take ˈaim at somebody/something

(American English) direct your criticism at or your attention to somebody/something: The unions are taking aim at the government.Several retail giants have now decided to take aim at the youth market.
See also: aim, somebody, something, take

aim at

v.
1. To point or direct something at someone or something: The archers drew back their arrows and aimed at the target.
2. To intend something for some purpose. Often used in the passive: We aimed our discussion at a solution to the financial problems. The new computer classes are aimed at teaching how computers work.
3. To be intended to achieve something: This new program aims at raising awareness about privacy issues.
4. To do or say something intended to affect someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: Their sarcasm was aimed directly at me. The antismoking campaign was aimed at teenagers.
See also: aim

aim for the sky

and reach for the sky and shoot for the sky
in. to aspire to something; to set one’s goals high. (See a different sense at reach for the sky.) Shoot for the sky, son. Don’t settle for second best. Don’t settle for less. Reach for the sky!
See also: aim, sky

reach for the sky

verb
See also: reach, sky

reach for the sky

1. Go to aim for the sky.
2. in. (a command) to put one’s hands up, as in a robbery. The bank teller reached for the sky without having to be told.
See also: reach, sky

take aim

1. To aim a weapon or object to be propelled.
2. To direct criticism or one's attention at something.
See also: aim, take
References in periodicals archive ?
It was attended by executives and managers from international multilateral agencies, civil society organizations, business leaders, government institutions, media, the academe, the AIM community, and the public.
'The role of Ghana in AIMS has been extremely important in other ways which are more important.'
In the past two years, AIMS and MNA have enjoyed a strong relationship, formally executing a liaison agreement and cooperating to promote AES67 technology, which is common to both organizations' roadmaps.
Adan Raufi who also works in United Arab Emirates, is heading the cardiology section of AIMS.
The National Intelligence Organization (MyT) had claimed a day before that a leaked voice recording and document about the assassination of three Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) operatives in Paris was aimed at preventing further steps from being taken in the peace process in which MyT was playing a central role.
At BIG AIMS each student is induced to the idea that they have entered the exciting and very creative film making and story-telling industry.
By 2009, Honda aims to begin leasing motorcycles powered by hydrogen fuel cells.
The long term aim of the Islamic Texts Society is to provide a comprehensive selection of books on various aspects of Islam.
When he could find no partners in this intellectual crime, he enlisted James Madison's support as a fellow member of the university's board of overseers in drafting regulations aimed at suppressing political heresy.
BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Systems Vice President and General Manager Pat McMahon said, "AIMS certification of the AN/UPX-37 is an important milestone for the program.
Aims had been looking for ways to keep the pilot-training equipment on campus since the simulator's former owner, Englewood-based Training Devices Inc., sought bankruptcy court protection.
Then ask him to aim the tip of the arrow at different things on the range.
By the time the assembly-information system, or AIMS, crashed in 1988, the engines were fully accepted in the market.
AIMS one of the central programmes is an intensive one year Masters Programme in Mathematical Sciences.
AIMS is both an early indicator and a driver of this African scientific renaissance, said Sir Michael Berry FRS, long-time supporter of the AIMS-Next Einstein Initiative.