aim at (someone or something)

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aim at (someone or something)

1. To point or guide an object, such as a weapon, at a target. Make sure you aim at the target before you pull the trigger. His water balloon is aimed at you! Run!
2. To target a particular issue or goal. The new program is aimed at helping struggling students get the tutoring they need to succeed in class.
3. To direct something at a specific person or group. I could tell that his rude remarks were aimed at me even though he did not mention my name. The studio's ad campaign is aiming at teenagers, but I think the movie is too violent for a young audience.
See also: aim

aim something at someone or something

to point or direct something at someone or something. Wally aimed the hose at Sarah and tried to soak her.
See also: aim

aim at

v.
1. To point or direct something at someone or something: The archers drew back their arrows and aimed at the target.
2. To intend something for some purpose. Often used in the passive: We aimed our discussion at a solution to the financial problems. The new computer classes are aimed at teaching how computers work.
3. To be intended to achieve something: This new program aims at raising awareness about privacy issues.
4. To do or say something intended to affect someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: Their sarcasm was aimed directly at me. The antismoking campaign was aimed at teenagers.
See also: aim
References in periodicals archive ?
"Apparently the offices felt medical coding was a bigger problem than screaming kids." Consequently, they launched two coding titles aimed at the same audiences.
This proposal, which is aimed at closely held REITs (i.e..
It will initially be aimed at PP fibers, textiles and molded parts.
This halogen-free, fine, white powder is aimed at PP and other thermoplastics.
The other melamine products are aimed at polyolefins.
These low-molecular weight brominated polycarbonates are already used in PBT and are now aimed at ABS and HIPS.
The use of biofeedback to reduce or eliminate nagging and maladaptive physical symptoms (e.g., various types of headaches, low-back pain, high blood pressure, uncontrolled seizures) can also be construed as a particular rehabilitation modality aimed at assisting clients physically adjust to community living.