aged

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Related to agedness: sexagenarians

middle-aged spread

Weight that accumulates around a person's midsection due to a decrease in metabolism caused by aging. Barry suddenly started dieting and exercising to prevent the middle-aged spread.
See also: spread

age out

To be too old to remain in an age-based classification or receive age-based services. When you turn 26, you will age out of your parents' health insurance coverage. When these kids turn 10, they'll age out of the after-school program.
See also: age, out

age in place

To live in a single appropriately accessible residence as one ages, as opposed to moving to more accessible dwellings as one's mobility decreases. Living in the granny pad on our son's property will allow us to age in place.
See also: age, place

age out (of something)

[for an adult] to grow [mentally or in years] out of certain behavior or out of a group or classification that is based on age. (Jargon.) Most of them tend to age out at about 35.
See also: age, out

age out

v.
To reach an age at which one is no longer eligible for certain special services, such as education or protection, from an authority: Unfortunately I have aged out of the special student scholarship program, so I have to pay full price for these classes.
See also: age, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooper chronicled the frontier conflicts of two groups with radically different senses of history, the pre-Columbian Indians in proud and embattled decline with the advancing European Americans seeking renewal from European agedness in a world that was new only to them.
Further exploiting the sentimental motif of youth tainted by unnatural agedness, Barrett Browning recreates a feature that surfaced repeatedly in Horne's report-descriptions of children whose innocence had literally been worked out of them and who "looked old and hard-featured, like a weather-beaten man of 40" (First Report, Q66).
The book is a treasure, and also an open door, as the paucity and agedness of many of the bibliographical references makes clear.