afraid of (one's) own shadow

(redirected from afraid of their own shadows)
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afraid of (one's) own shadow

Easily scared; jumpy; timid. Everyone was surprised that Janice led the meeting with confidence, as she normally seems afraid of her own shadow. Please don't take my sister to a haunted house on Halloween—she's afraid of her own shadow.
See also: afraid, of, own, shadow

afraid of one's own shadow

Fig. easily frightened; always frightened, timid, or suspicious. (An exaggeration.) After Tom was robbed, he was even afraid of his own shadow.
See also: afraid, of, own, shadow

afraid of one's own shadow

Very timid and fearful, as in Richard constantly worries about security; he's afraid of his own shadow. This hyperbole has been used in English since the early 1500s, and some writers believe it originated in ancient Greece.
See also: afraid, of, own, shadow

afraid of your own shadow

If someone is afraid of their own shadow, they are very nervous and shy. She's afraid of everything these days — afraid of her own shadow. Note: Adjectives such as scared or frightened can be used instead of afraid. He used to be scared of his own shadow as a little boy.
See also: afraid, of, own, shadow

afraid of (or frightened of) your own shadow

unreasonably timid or nervous.
See also: afraid, of, own, shadow
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem is the Senate, where Republicans hold a razor-thin majority, Democrat leaders are determined to block any pro-rights legislation, and Republican leaders are afraid of their own shadows.
The 30th IB PA troops were afraid of their own shadows after they heard that the NPA will attack their camp in the Multi-Purpose Barangay Hall in Budlingin,' he said.
People are sometimes said to be afraid of their own shadows, not a pretty state
But, he noted, because mortgage lending and underwriting has not eased, it has actually prevented a housing boom of even greater proportions, with "lenders afraid of their own shadows.
Too many people in positions of moderate responsibility are almost literally afraid of their own shadows, reluctant to make decisions in case something goes wrong or they contravene procedures.
They seem afraid of their own shadows and as a result leadership, so crucially needed on the pitch, is not emerging.
Afraid of their own shadows, how will they stand up to the battle-scarred and ideologically driven McCain?