affix (one's) signature to

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affix (one's) signature to

To sign one's name to something, such as a document. Jason reads every contract thoroughly before affixing his signature to the bottom of it. Once you affix your signature to this last document, you'll be the owner of a brand-new car!
See also: affix, signature

affix one's signature to something

to sign one's name on something. I affixed my signature to each of the documents.
See also: affix, signature
References in classic literature ?
and in all probability it would have stood over for one day at least, had it not been for the prompt, though, at first sight, undutiful behaviour of Sam, who, seizing his father by the skirt of the coat, dragged him to the counter, and pinned him there, until he had affixed his signature to a couple of instruments; which, from Mr.
As the mass concluded in the vaulted catacombs, each of the prelates came up to the altar and affixed his signature to a brief but passionate manifesto that stated, in its essence, to try to live according to the ordinary manner of our people in all that concerns housing, food, means of transport, and related matters.
Official Vatican news organs have reported that Pope Francis has affixed his signature to a decree affirming the "venerable" status of Metropolitan Archbishop Andrey Sheptytsky.
This explains why Prince Salman affixed his signature to the royal order even if protocol and his own allegiance to his sovereign were sufficient.
Surrounded by a crowd of cheering religious conservatives and GOP faithful rounded up by Texas Republican Party officials, Perry affixed his signature to two measures, one requiring girls under the age of 18 to acquire parental consent before obtaining an abortion and another certifying a ballot initiative banning same-sex marriage next year.
When President Bush affixed his signature to the No Child Left Behind Act on January 8, 2002, he arguably brought to life the most important piece of federal education legislation since 1965.
Nathan Noland, president of the Indiana Coal Council, told Coal Age after O'Bannon affixed his signature to Senate Bill (S.
Baldwin affixed his signature to 15,000 letters that began going out Monday as part of a study of Americans' exposure to radioactivity.