advocate

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angel's advocate

One who looks for and argues in support of the positive aspects and benefits of a certain argument, whether or not they believe them to be true. it is the opposite of a "devil's advocate," who argues against something for the sake of argument, not due to a personal opinion. I know a lot of people oppose the building of a new railway, but let me play angel's advocate for a second and tell you about all the ways it will improve our city!
See also: advocate

be (the) devil's advocate

To argue against or attack an idea, argument, or proposition—even if one is in favor of it—for the sake of debate or to further examine its strength, validity, or details. Refers to the "Advocatus Diaboli," a person employed by the Catholic Church to argue against the canonization of a saint (and therefore help determine if that person is truly worthy of sainthood). I'm all for universal health care, but I'll be devil's advocate in asking how the government intends to fund such a massive undertaking. Tom is always the devil's advocate in any given conversation because he loves picking apart other people's arguments.
See also: advocate

play (the) devil's advocate

To argue against or attack an idea, argument, or proposition—even if one is in favor of it—for the sake of debate or to further examine its strength, validity, or details. Refers to the "Advocatus Diaboli," a person employed by the Catholic Church to argue against the canonization of a saint (and therefore help determine if that person is truly worthy of sainthood). I'm all for universal health care, but I'll play devil's advocate in asking how the government intends to fund such a massive undertaking. Tom is always playing devil's advocate in any given conversation because he loves picking apart other people's arguments.
See also: advocate, play

devil's advocate

One who argues against or attacks an idea, argument, or proposition—even if one is in favor of it—for the sake of debate or to further examine its strength, validity, or details. Refers to the "Advocatus Diaboli," a person employed by the Catholic Church to argue against the canonization of a saint (and therefore help determine if that person is truly worthy of sainthood). I'm all for universal health care, but I'll be the devil's advocate in asking how the government intends to fund such a massive undertaking. Tom is always the devil's advocate in any given conversation because he loves picking apart other people's arguments.
See also: advocate

play (the) devil's advocate

Fig. to put forward arguments against or objections to a proposition-which one may actually agree with-purely to test the validity of the proposition. (The devil's advocate opposes the canonization of a saint in order to prove that the grounds for canonization are sound.) I agree with your plan. I'm just playing the devil's advocate so you'll know what the opposition will say. Mary offered to play devil's advocate and argue against our case so that we would find out any flaws in it.
See also: advocate, play

devil's advocate

One who argues against a cause or position either for the sake of argument or to help determine its validity. For example, My role in the campaign is to play devil's advocate to each new policy before it's introduced to the public . This term comes from the Roman Catholic Church, where advocatus diaboli (Latin for "devil's advocate") signifies an official who is appointed to present arguments against a proposed canonization or beatification. It was transferred to wider use in the mid-1700s.
See also: advocate

play devil's advocate

COMMON If you play devil's advocate in a discussion, you pretend to disagree with what someone says in order to make the discussion interesting or to make people think hard about an issue. My motive for playing devil's advocate is to provoke them into thinking about what we mean when we say something is `genetic'. Note: People also use devil's advocate to describe someone who acts in this way. Interviewers may take on the role of devil's advocate simply to see how effectively you can support your idea in the face of opposition.
See also: advocate, play

play devil's advocate

take a side in an argument that is the opposite of what you really want or think.
A translation of the Latin phrase advocatus diaboli , devil's advocate is the popular name for the official in the Roman Catholic Church who puts the case against a candidate for canonization or beatification; he is more properly known as promotor fidei ‘promoter of the faith’.
1994 Jude Deveraux The Invitation She had played devil's advocate with herself a thousand times.
See also: advocate, play

a/the devil’s ˈadvocate

a person who argues against something, even though they really agree with it, just to test the arguments for it: Helen doesn’t really think that women shouldn’t go out to work. She just likes to play devil’s advocate.
See also: advocate
References in periodicals archive ?
Shamberger is the director of a medical laboratory that performs these in vitro tests may have something to do with his advocation of these worthless diagnostic endeavors.
Marshall's advocation of economic chivalry is usually associated exclusively with his 1907 paper in the Economic Journal.
Also, he does not explain why Stoker's attitude toward the Balkans should have radically changed between the 1890s and 1909, beyond the general statement that "his [Stoker's] position is still patriotic and in advocation of British self-interest" (122).
As her title indicates, she analyzes the gradual transformation from Boiardo's sense of civic and moral duty, through Ariosto, to Tasso's more independent advocation of an individual pursuit of happiness free from societal constraints.
We even allowed a mad cleric to spew out racial and religious hatred, including the advocation of terrorist bombings in this country.
From La loca de la casa's advocation of a greater degree of class mobility to Mariucha's (1903) championing of a more egalitarian society where class and gender were no longer impediments to social progress, from El abuelo's (1904) treatment of heredity to Alceste's (1914) rewriting of mythology, they offered a space for the incursions of women into a public space that had all too often negated or wilfully packaged their visibility.
We do not mean for this article to be a defense of or an advocation for atheism or even a complete and accurate accounting of this issue, but rather an attempt to bring attention to a minority group that has been so far ignored in the diversity conversation among counseling professionals.
The most apparent and frequent rhetorical move in the essay takes the following form: a tendency or disposition of Barthes's is described; this is then represented as being either symptomatic of, or a bold extension of, modern aestheticism; finally, the tendency is summed up as having as its ultimate goal the expression and advocation of "pleasure.
Vives's contribution to the art of letter-writing and its anticipation of Lipsius's advocation of a simple epistolary style receive due recognition.
She refuses to lie down and follow him, or to let her daughters do the same, as in the poem "Advice," a powerful advocation for speech, for speaking out, for the necessity of using words to save the world: "Dear children, you must try to say / Something when you are in need.
One of the most frequently analyzed aspects of Charles Baudelaire's aesthetic writings is his advocation of imagination and originality as the primary creative forces in making art.
It was at the time when he was going head-to-head with ITN's Martyn Lewis who subsequently got ridiculed for his advocation of more 'good news' on television.
Should the Bar allow advocation of gay adoption, not only would I object, but believe that a legal challenge may be in order.
I posit that these explanatory factors, other than trend, are themselves random occurrences, and therefore take seriously Lucas's (1976) advocation that policy should be modeled as the outcome of a stochastic process (see Dotsey 1990).
Awesome too that the controversial quintet -who flaunted two extrovert gay male singers and whose debut release and previous number one,Relax, had been banned by the Beeb for its advocation of the joys of copulation -had chosen their second release to concentrate on the threat of Armageddon.