admit

(redirected from admits)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms.

admit defeat

To yield to the opposition or accept that one is wrong in some pursuit. Well, I ran a good campaign, but it is time I admitted defeat in this election.
See also: admit, defeat

admit (someone or something) into

1. To allow something to be used as evidence in a trial. The prosecuting attorney tried to admit new documents into evidence.
2. To allow one membership or entry. That university only admits the best applicants into its law program. Luckily, a worker admitted us into the store, even though it was about to close.
See also: admit

admit (one) to

1. To permit one to enter. This ticket will admit you to the art exhibit. We were admitted to the club after we showed the security guard our identification.
2. To confess or acknowledge a personal wrongdoing. When used in this way, there is no noun or pronoun between "admit" and "to." "To" can be followed by either the misdeed or the recipient of the confession. Beth finally admitted to cheating on the test. Ryan would not admit to his parents that he had damaged their car.
See also: admit

I don't mind admitting (something)

I want to tell you something, even if it might be negative, embarrassing, or puts me in a bad light. I don't mind admitting that I paid way too much money for this computer, so shop around if you're looking for one for yourself. The movie was powerful—I don't mind admitting that I was sobbing like a baby by the end of it.
See also: admit, mind

I don't mind telling you (something)

I want to tell you something, even if it might be negative, embarrassing, or puts me in a bad light. I don't mind telling you that I paid way too much money for this computer, so shop around if you're looking for one for yourself. The movie was powerful—I don't mind telling you that I was sobbing like a baby by the end of it.
See also: mind, telling

admit someone (in)to (some place)

to allow someone to enter some place. They refused to admit us into the theater.
See also: admit

admit something into something

to allow something to be introduced into something else. You cannot admit this document into the body of evidence!
See also: admit

admit something to someone

to confess something to someone. Harry admitted his error to his uncle.
See also: admit

admit to something

to acknowledge or confess something; to acknowledge or confess to having done something. Max would not admit to anything.
See also: admit

I don’t mind adˈmitting, ˈtelling you..., etc.

used to emphasize what you are saying, especially when you are talking about something that may be embarrassing for you: I was scared, I don’t mind telling you!
See also: mind, telling

admit into

v.
To allow someone or something to enter or be a part of something: This school does not admit students into a degree program without a high school diploma. The judge admitted the documents into evidence. We were admitted into the theater even though we were very late.
See also: admit

admit of

v.
To allow the possibility of something: This problem admits of two very different solutions.
See also: admit, of

admit to

v.
1. To confess something to someone: I didn't want to admit my crimes to them. At first they lied, but later they admitted to the police that they had stolen the bicycle.
2. To confess something: He will never admit to feeling jealous. She admitted to her lies.
See also: admit
References in classic literature ?
But to be a town councilor and discuss how many dustmen are needed, and how chimneys shall be constructed in the town in which I don't live--to serve on a jury and try a peasant who's stolen a flitch of bacon, and listen for six hours at a stretch to all sorts of jabber from the counsel for the defense and the prosecution, and the president cross-examining my old half-witted Alioshka, 'Do you admit, prisoner in the dock, the fact of the removal of the
I admit that he would be worth waiting for, this superman of yours," laughed the captain.
I suppose that I should be ashamed to admit it, but it's the truth.
In rapid succession recently, we've seen several large districts admit that dropouts are a major problem.
Paige defended his former district's accomplishments, but did admit to the Times "there probably was" a dropout problem in Houston.
Henderson admits forgiveness is hard, but so is the alternative.
As he starts his survey of many of the world's trouble spots, he admits that there is a `link between personal and institutional forgiveness' but leaves the social and foreign policy implications `to those who are better qualified to tackle the subject'.
Ignoring, for the moment, the question of how "needs-blind" a system is that admits one-fifth of each class on the assumption that, hey, their parents might give us money, Fitzsimmons's defense doesn't quite ring true.
This agreement underscores the growing market demand for Admits and the validation of the Windows NT platform for ticketing and access control applications," Soechtig said.